Ross reveals power of women’s fury in TED Talk

Hell hath no fury like a woman — and that fury has deep roots, according to Tracee Ellis Ross.

According to HuffPost, the actor recently gave a TED Talk at the organization’s annual conference in Vancouver, Canada on “the spectrum of objectification women have faced for hundreds of years, and the anger women harbor because of it.” What’s more, HuffPost says Ross explained in her 10-minute talk that this anger should be embraced.

“Women, I encourage you to acknowledge your fury,” she said. “Give it language. Share it in safe places of identification and in safe ways. Your fury is not something to be afraid of. It holds lifetimes of wisdom. Let it breathe and listen.”

Opening her speech with a story of a female friend who was physically moved by a man who was trying to reach something she was blocking, HuffPost says Ross used the anecdotes as a launch pad to explain the depth and extent of the rage women feel, offering that her friend’s fury was “ignited by lifetimes of men helping themselves to women’s bodies without consent.”

To make the experience more relatable to male listeners, HuffPost says Ross equated it to having a stranger take your phone out of your hand’s every day, and having the stranger explain away their reasoning for taking the phone in the first place.

“Somehow, no one ever talks about the person who took the cellphone,” Ross explained. “Men are so used to helping themselves, that it’s like … [shrugging] they can’t help themselves. And not because men are fundamentally less moral, but because this is a very big blind spot for most men.”

After stating that her friend’s fury — and that of countless women around the world — “holds centuries of never being able to directly address or express [women’s] indignation, our frustration and our rage,” HuffPost says Ross concluded her talk with two very powerful words as of late: “time’s up.”

“Time’s up on women being held responsible for men’s bad behavior,” she said. “It is men’s responsibility to change men’s bad behavior.”

Watch her TED Talk in full right here.

Fallon to Fey: ‘I hope my kids grow up to be like you’

Jimmy Fallon recently used part of The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon to pay some high compliments to friend and former Saturday Night Live co-star Tina Fey, and it resulted in a pretty touching moment.

According to HuffPost, to commemorate the opening of Fey’s “Mean Girls” musical, Fallon had guests to show “to stand in front of a poster for the play and describe how the “30 Rock” creator inspired them” while Fey stood hidden in a back room listening and then surprising them with hugs and tears.

But, as HuffPost reportsthis wasn’t the only tear-jerking moment of the episode; Fallon said there was one more person who wanted to deliver a “heartfelt message” to Fey — him.

While his comments were not without jokes — namely, jokes about their ages — HuffPost said Fallon offered that Fey “changed [him] for the better” and serves as an example for all, including his own children.

“I met you when I was 23, I believe you were 45. And I was lucky enough to work with you and grow with you and learn from you. A lot of people in this world have dreams or goals or ideas, but not everybody goes out and fights to make them happen but you’re someone who did. You didn’t get served this, you didn’t get given this as a gift. I know firsthand, you worked so hard and found a voice and found your way, and you made your own dreams come true, and most importantly even now you’re making other people feel like they can do the same thing and change the world.

Today, I’m 27 years old and I have two daughters, and my hope for them is that they grow up to be leaders like you and that they’ll be as fearless and confident in their strengths as you are.”

Ending his remarks with a simple “I love you,” Fallon proved what we already know — Tina Fey is one for the ages.

Mendes & Reinhart reveal photos were edited for magazine

Two Riverdale actors were not about to let their photoshopped magazine covers go unnoticed, so they called out the publication in the most public way possible — on social media.

According to Elite Daily, Camila Mendes and Lili Reinhart both were photographed for Cosmopolitan Philippines, though their cover photos looked a bit different than they remembered: instead of showing their real figures, the images were instead shaven down in Photoshop, showing the actors as impossibly narrower than they are. So to bring attention to the unwarranted editing, the duo decided to point out the adjustments on Instagram.

“@lilireinhart and I feel disrespected & disturbed by the sight of our photoshopped bodies,” Mendes wrote via her Instagram Story, according to Elite Daily. “We want [Cosmopolitan Philippines] readers to know that those bodies are not ours.”

Both Mendes and Reinhart proceeded to post a sequence of their original images followed by the edited photos in their Instagram stories, says Elite Daily, highlighting the area of their torsos that were trimmed with a photo editing tool. Beyond this, Mendes also offered a written response on her Instagram story, writing that she and her Riverdale counterpart feel disrespected by the changes made to their photos.

Calling their figures “distorted,” Elite Daily says Mendes wrote that she and Reinhart “prefer to see our bodies the way they actually are. I’m not interested in having a slimmer waist, I’m more than satisfied with the one that I already have.”

Tell ’em, Camila!

See the images in question here.

Male actors to don black at Globes

With female actors planning on wearing black to the Golden Globes this year to protest sexual misconduct and gender inequality in the entertainment industry, their male counterparts are joining in their support.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Ilaria Urbinanti, a celebrity stylist, “confirmed that at least some of the gents attending the big event will also be donning black in solidarity with their female colleagues.”

Urbinanti took to Instagram to share that some of Hollywood’s leading men will wear all black, says EW, or at least all of the men she styles will be taking part in the movement — men such as The Rock, as well as Tom Hiddleston and Armie Hammer.

With women’s voices finally getting the attention and support they deserve, perhaps Urbinanti summed it up best when she wrote, “Safe to say this may not be the right time to choose to be the odd man out here… just sayin…”

Munn motions for end to sexual assault

With sexual misconduct at the fore of public discussion, Olivia Munn is keeping the conversation going with a brand-new essay she penned for Entertainment Weekly.

Following her own tale of being on the receiving end of sexual harassment, Glamour says the actor wrote an essay identifying the ways in which our culture must shift in order to prevent abuses of power and further sexual misconduct, starting by pointing out the root of such actions:

“In our world today—and it’s not just Hollywood, it’s the same for girls and women all over the world who have survived sexual abuse and/or harassment—abusers don’t usually get in trouble unless the victim is broken first, because the violating act alone is not damaging enough to spark society’s outrage. It’s a marathon towards self-destruction in order to gain credibility and a vicious circle of victim-blaming. When people ask how these men in powerful positions were able to hurt so many people for so many years, I look to the people at the top and ask those questions.”

Calling the issue not a women’s issue but “an abuse-of-power issue,” Glamour says Munn offered that nothing in our culture can be changed until we change the core of our institutions that breed sweeping male hegemony.

“…Until we eradicate the diseased roots of our infrastructure and make foundational, systemic changes, nothing will change,” she wrote. “We should create a zero-tolerance policy with actionable consequences for sexual assault and any other forms of abuse. Heads of studios, bosses, and CEOs should enforce equal pay because continuing to pay us less perpetuates a bias that women are inferior.”

Concluding her essay, Glamour says Munn asked that those in positions of power go against the system and work to create an inclusive and safe environment for women to grow, succeed and thrive, because after all, “We’re strong. We’re not afraid to call each other out—and we’re not afraid to call you out anymore either.”

Amen to that!

Read the full essay here.