Beyoncé takes over September issue of ‘Vogue’

Queen Bey has extended her reign to the cover of Vogue.

According to HuffPost, Beyoncé has been given ” unprecedented control over the cover of the upcoming September issue, sources say, and the music icon hired the first black photographer to shoot a cover in the publication’s 126-year history. ”

With Anna Wintour giving the multi-hyphenate full control over not only the cover, but also the photos on the inside of her and their captions — something HuffPost says the publication is “contractually obligated” to do — the move is unprecedented in terms of the breadth and depth of the control relinquished.

HuffPost says a source reports that typically, “cover subjects are usually given little to no say in their photos and are sent the cover in the week ahead of publication.” Beyoncé, however, has had control of much of the process, says HuffPost, right down to writing photo captions, which are in “long-form” — and of course, selecting her own photographer.

Tasked with snapping the perfect shot of the singer is 23-year-old Tyler Mitchell, who HuffPost says has already made a name for himself by photographing fashion campaigns for Marc Jacobs and Givenchy.

While sources speculate that Mitchell was chosen as a direct result of Beyoncé’s “power and influence,” HuffPosts says the quality of Mitchell’s work may speak for itself.

“I depict black people and people of color in a really real and pure way,” he told The New York Times in December. “There is an honest gaze to my photos.”

No matter the reason for his selection, we’re sure of one thing: this cover is going to be loved lights out.

 

 

 

Chambers unloads on fashion industry

For 36 years, Lucinda Chambers worked for British Vogue, serving last as the publication’s fashion director. But after stepping down from the position in May, Fashionista reports that Chambers has a lot to say about her time at Vogue — and the way in which she left the glossy.

In a new interview with VestojFashionista says Chambers detailed her Vogue exit as not a conscious choice, but instead a decision made for her by the magazine’s new editor-in chief, Edward Enninful, who decided to fire her after taking the reigns.

“It took them three minutes to do it,” she said. “No one knew, except the man who did it — the new editor.”

But that’s not all Chambers divulged. According to Fashionista, the ex-fashion director revealed that working in fashion isn’t all beauty, glitz and glamour. In fact, it’s much more of a business that’s trying to sell the public a particular way of being, thinking and looking. Speaking on fashion magazines as a whole, Fashionista reports that Chambers thinks they have stopped being “useful or empowering.”

“Most leave you totally anxiety-ridden, for not having the right kind of dinner party, setting the table in the right kind of way or meeting the right kind of people,” she said.

Going on to detail even more of the fashion industry’s behind-the-scenes dealings, Fashionista says Chambers admitted to succumbing to the pressures of the industry, even dressing a cover model in Michael Kors top simple because the designer was a major advertiser with the magazine.

Tired of the “smoke and mirrors” of the fashion industry, Fashionista said Chambers had this to say on the industry overall: “Fashion can chew you up and spit you out.”

Everything that glitters is not gold, it seems. To read more about her interview, click here.

‘Goop’ to go to print with Condé Nast

For a digital platform to take on a print form in our web-based era is almost unheard of, but Goop is set to go to print, thanks to a new partnership with Condé Nast.

According to Variety, Gwyneth Paltrow’s ” female-focused digital lifestyle brand” has “teamed up with Condé Nast in a partnership anchored around a print magazine that will encompass content on digital and social media.”

The magazine will be released quarterly starting in September, reports WWD, and will feature both print content from Goop as well as creative and design input from Condé Nast. Centering on themes of health and wellness, WWD says that the concept for a print-version of Goop came to life following a conversation between Paltrow (Goop’s founder and CEO) and Editor in Chief of Vogue and Condé Nast artistic director Anna Wintour.

Variety says the quarterly glossies will be branded as “premium, collectible editions.”

‘Vogue’ Visionary Stepping Down

If you love fashion, chances are you’ve picked up a copy of Vogue at least once in your life and ogled at the luxurious designer goods and impeccably-styled models displayed throughout the magazine’s glossy pages. But on Jan. 20, news broke that has the potential to change the lauded fashion bible as we know it.

According to The New York Times, Grace Coddington, the creative director of Vogue, announced she will be stepping down from her position at the Condé Nast publication. A spokeswoman for the company explained that Coddington will act as a “creative editor at large,” producing “several” articles a year for Vogue while pursuing other opportunities.

Coddington told industry website Business of Fashion that although she will be scaling back her position, she still looks forward to contributing to the magazine. “I’m not running away from Vogue, because it has opened so many doors. But it will be nice to collaborate, and nice to go out (and) give talks to people,” she said of her future plans.

The now-former creative director assumed her place in the spotlight after the 2009 documentary, “The September Issue,” was released, which followed famed Editor-In-Chief Anna Wintour and her team as they compiled the magazine’s 840-page September 2007 issue — the largest single issue of a magazine ever printed, reports NPR.

Although Coddington has been with Vogue and worked side by side with Wintour for 28 years, The New York Times speculates that her departure may have been long overdue. In a 2014 interview with The Financial Times, Coddington said, “I’ve been saying, ‘I’m going to leave tomorrow’ for the last 10 years.” While her exit may comes as a shock to us Vogue readers, her vacancy may usher in a series of surprises that may change the publication as we know it.

The New York Times’ Vanessa Friedman describes three potential changes that may take place. Coddington and Wintour both assumed their positions at Vogue in 1988, while Executive Fashion Editor Phyllis Posnick has been at the magazine since 1987 and Fashion Director Tonne Goodman added her name to the masthead in 1999; Her exit, then, may spur other changes in leadership at the magazine.

Second, Friendman suggests that as Condé Nast reconciles their print publications with their respective online presences, any decisions Winter may make as the magazine’s artistic director will signal a longterm editorial strategy that will impact the magazine’s future.

Finally, Coddington celebrated fashion as a means to “transport and transform,” which balanced out Wintour’s practicality and business prowess. Their strengths combined to form the publication we have all come to love, and Coddington’s absence may mean an overall change in direction for Vogue.

While Coddington is bowing out from her post at Vogue, The New York Times says that she is not retiring altogether. In fact, she is set to release a perfume with fashion company Comme De Garçons in April, while working on a follow-up book to her 2002 title, “Grace: Thirty Years of Fashion at Vogue.” There’s even talk of a film being made on her 2012 autobiography, “Grace.”

Perhaps Coddington explained her plans post-Vogue best when she said, “It’s just another approach. I’m certainly not going to retire. I don’t want to sit around.”

Clearly, Coddington has more work to do on more things that will, undoubtedly, find their way into our hearts yet again.