Whittaker to earn same salary as ‘Doctor Who’ predecessor

With [white] women working full-time in the United States still only earning 80 percent of what their male counterparts make, achieving pay equity is still a work in progress. In fact, the American Association of University Women estimates that it will take until the year 2059 to achieve full pay parity. But to achieve this end, we must make small gains now to benefit all women in the future.

And for the newest Doctor on Doctor Who, a small step toward pay parity has been made. According to Glamour, BBC director Tony Hall confirmed that Jodie Whittaker — the first female Doctor on Doctor Who — will “receive the same pay for the show as her predecessor, Peter Capaldi.”

As for Whittaker and her newfound role, the actor is excited to be the first to break the mold on the popular show.

“It feels completely overwhelming,” she told BBC, “as a feminist, as a woman, as an actor, as a human, as someone who wants to continually push themselves and challenge themselves, and not be boxed in by what you’re told you can and can’t be.”

Yousafzai brings advocacy to social media

While Malala Yousafzai officially completed her last day of secondary school, the 19-year-old education advocate is far from finished in her fight to secure education for girls around the world.

In fact, BBC reports that to mark her last official day as a high schooler on July 7, Yousafzai sent her first-ever tweet from her account to share a message on education and her future pursuits in advocating for education worldwide.

“I know that millions of girls around the world are out of school and may never get the opportunity to complete their education,” she wrote in a thread of six tweets, says BBC. “Next week, I will be back on my to meet girls in Middle East, Africa & Latin America.”

Completing her thread by reaffirming the power of girls’ voices as “our most powerful weapons in the fight for education and equality,” BBC says Yousafzai asked her more than 200,000 followers to join her in her efforts for education.

“On and off Twitter, I’m fighting for girls —  will you join me?​”

We surely will, Malala.

Macron fills cabinet with female ministers

The faces of French leadership are increasingly female, thanks to new French President Emmanuel Macron.

According to the BBC, Macron has already created a “gender-balanced cabinet,” filling 11 of 22 positions with female ministers, fulfilling an early campaign promise.

Some of the women taking up cabinet positions include, Sylvie Goulard, who the BBC says will be the defense minister, while Laura Flessel — an Olympic fencer — is sports minister. BBC also reports that Macron named Marlène Schiappa, whose s”uccessful blog Maman Works saw her dubbed the ‘spokeswoman for working mums,'” a junior minister for gender equity.

While the move certainly places women in high-ranking positions, the BBC says that “one of the top five posts, that of defence, went to a woman.”

 

 

France outlaws frail models

A new law is going into effect in France that protects models from becoming too frail.

According to HuffPost, the law — passed in 2015 and enacted this year — not only bans “excessively thin fashion models,” it also requires models to get a “doctor’s certificate to prove they are healthy.”

BBC also reports that the newly-enacted law will specifically focus models’ Body Mass Index (BMI) in an effort to “fight eating disorders and inaccessible ideals of beauty.”

But models aren’t the only ones subject to new regulation; HuffPost says that any and all photos of models that are “digitally-altered” have to be labelled as a “retouched photograph,” a demarcation that is required on all altered photos starting Oct. 1.

What happens if modeling agencies don’t comply with the new health standards? HuffPost says they can face up to $82,000 in fines and six months of jail time.