Lawrence poses body-positive social media message

With warmer weather quickly approaching, many may feel pressured to get ready to share bikini photos on social media. But one model is here to tell us that we don’t have to.

According to Cosmopolitanmodel and Aerie REAL model Iskra Lawrence recently posted a fresh patch of bikini photos to Instagram, and along with them, a caption that offered that not every bikinigram has to be accompanied by a body-positive message or a “philosophical caption.” Instead, she offered that we all should feel comfortable posting as much or as little as we want, showing as much or as little as we want — because all of us are deserving of respect.

“A bikini pic or anything else doesn’t have to have a philosophical caption or be about body posi because maybe it seems more purposeful now or demands more respect,” she wrote in her post’s caption, Cosmo reports. “You deserve the same respect regardless of what you choose to wear.”

Lawrence wanted to make one other thing clear: we all shouldn’t feel pressure to “post swim or underwear pics for likes, follows or because u see people like me doing it. Your comfort and confidence is wayyyy more important, so stay true to you.”

And with that, Lawrence wrapped up her comments with a cool “no airbrushin no problem” and sent us on our body-positive, feeling-confident way. And sometimes, that all we need is a quick reminder to do what works for us.

 

Veras verifies body positivity in swimsuit photos

Everybody has a bikini body, no matter what the haters say, and Diana Veras proved this to be true in a string of recent swimsuit photos posted on social media.

According to Cosmopolitanwhen the model’s Instagram photo of herself looking fierce in a pink off-the-shoulder bikini drew negative comments from online trolls, Veras decided not to hide but to instead fight fire with fire — by posting even more bikini photos on Twitter.

Directing the photos’ caption to those shaming her, Cosmo said Veras wrote, “Here’s more of my lil chubby ass in a bathing suit since it offends men so much.”

With over 75,000 likes and 16,000 retweets, Veras followed up her popular clap-back photos with a written statement, sharing that she hopes people understand there are variations of beauty that deserve equal admiration.

“…Don’t forget that I can’t speak for all plus sized women,” she wrote. “We all come in all different shapes, sizes, proportions, colors, and ALLLLLL of our beauty should be celebrated. Even though I’ve had my own struggles with my body, I don’t want 2 silence the voices of other beautiful women who also deserve recognition for their efforts.”

Perhaps Veras said it best when she concluded her message by saying, “There is so much room for all of us to shine.”

Swimsuit photo preaches body positivity

If you don’t look like supermodels on the runway or in advertisements, it’s easy to be critical of your body. In fact, when we grow accustomed to seeing idealized depictions of the female body, we may come to believe that there is something wrong with us for not looking the same way — and that sentiment can seep into the minds of women and girls of all ages.

Just ask Rachel Spencer, who HuffPost reports took to Instagram this week to share a side-by-side photo of her 13-year-old self and her 26-year-old self to demonstrate the importance of body confidence. According to HuffPost, the confidence and success coach shared an image that shows her younger self covering her stomach in a swimsuit and her current self showing off her body with the caption “Self Love Queen.”

Her lengthy caption detailed why young Rachel was ashamed of her body because boys bullied her, which HuffPost says made her no longer want to go to the pool, let alone show off her body. Exacerbated by the media’s representation of women’s bodies, HuffPost says Spencer shared she felt at age 13 that she needed to change the way she looked.

“Why was a 13 year old worried about cellulite??? Because the media told her it was bad. That SHE was bad and needed to change,” she wrote.

But, Spencer finally managed to overcome these feelings with a little self love.

“There’s a big difference between the closed off, hiding, young girl on the left and the carefree, happy, open girl on the right. ❤️And that difference is self love.❤️” she wrote, according to HuffPost. “I taught it to myself. I had to. I had to find a way to be happy. The process wasn’t quick. I’m still working on it at 26 years old.”

Spencer concluded her post with a message to anyone who is still uncomfortable with their bodies, says HuffPost, saying that every body is a beautiful body.

“Put on that bikini and smile. Don’t feel the need to let other people’s opinions ruin precious memories with your friends and family,” she wrote. “Show your daughters what it’s like to flaunt their flaws at the pool. No shame. Your imperfections tell a story. Your body is beautiful. You are BEAUTIFUL.”

 

‘SI Swim’ editor celebrates body diversity

The latest issue of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition has been billed as “the most inclusive ever,” according to editor MJ Day, featuring women of all ages, sizes and ethnicities. But now, the editor is taking things one step further by getting in on the action herself.

According to ELLE, Day posted a video to the “Women IRL” Instagram account, donning a black bikini and posing with her 2-year-old son on her hip, all in an effort to “kick off a campaign to celebrate all body types.”

Designed to get followers to “pose in their own swimsuits and explain the traits and aspirations they ‘model’ to others,” ELLE says that Day explained in her post that the initiative is all about celebrating the things that make us inherently beautiful.

“I’m determined to get out the message that there’s not a singular definition of beauty,” she said in the video, adding in her caption when she shared the post on her own Instagram account that we “need to love ourselves in the present. No matter what.”