Lively takes down reporter

Not every red carpet is about fashion. In fact, most aren’t, as they should be a celebration of accomplishments and not looks — especially that of Variety magazine’s Powered by Women luncheon.

According to Glamour, Blake Lively — an honoree at this year’s event for her work to end child pornography — was met not with a question about her endeavors but about her fashion choices, and decided to let the reporter know how inappropriate the question was.

“Are we really doing this? Would you ask a man that?” Lively said, according to a video captured by USA Today’s Maeve McDermott, reports Glamour. “[I hope we] become more aware, and that we change, and that we build women up. So, you can ask me another question.”

Attending the luncheon for her work with Child Rescue Coalition, a group that seeks to not only “apprehend and convict abusers of children,” but to also rescue those affected and prevent future abuse, Glamour points out that the journalist’s questions on fashion were egregiously unmerited, especially within the context of Lively’s speech:

“The kids are getting younger and the content is getting more devastating,” she said, according to USA Today. “When a law enforcement officer told me this, I asked, ‘How young are the victims?’ And he told me infants—and I have a 6-month-old daughter.”

Here’s hoping future reporters can focus more on what others do instead of how they look.

Lively promotes ‘girl power’ in PCAs speech

When Blake Lively won a People’s Choice Award at the Jan. 18 event, she used the moment to give a speech that encouraged young girls to shed any limitations placed on them.

According to Entertainment Weekly, after winning a PCA for Favorite Dramatic Movie Actress, Lively shared words of wisdom passed down to her from her mother:

“My mom, she always taught me as a kid that you can’t ever let anyone limit you. Don’t ever let anyone tell you there’s something you can’t do,” she said.

Sharing that as a child, she wanted to meet the Spice Girls, EW says the actress told the audience what she learned from idolizing the girl group. “What was so neat about them was that they’re all do distinctly different, and they were women, and they owned who they were, and that was my first introduction into girl power,” Lively said.

With her award, Lively contended that a vote for the Favorite Actress category was a vote for girl power. “Watching this movie, and the women nominated in this category — when you guys voted for this, you didn’t just vote for this movie or me, but you voted for girl power,” Lively said, according to EW. “And men voted for girl power, too, and you guys are awesome for doing that.”

Adding that her win and her peers’ nominations proves that people “want to hear stories about women,” Lively concluded her speech by calling on fans to share their stories, because “You need to be heard, you are valuable, and no one can limit you!”

Stars support education for girls around the world

Countless girls may be one step closer to achieving an education thanks to the help of a celebrity-backed campaign.

According to Teen Vogue, 81 celebrities — including Lady Gaga, Blake Lively, Natalie Portman, Danai Gurira and Rashida Jones — have “signed an open letter that is part of ONE‘s campaign to support education of girls all around the world.”

Called “Poverty is Sexist,” the organization’s campaign seeks to help the nearly 130 million girls who lack funds necessary to attain a proper education secure just that, says Teen Vogue; the open letter signed by some of Hollywood’s best and brightest will be sent to leaders around the world in the hopes that action will be taken to give all girls access to education.

“All children deserve a good education, but in the poorest countries girls are denied it more often than boys,” the open letter says, according to Teen Vogue. “Education is vital for moving out of poverty. Every additional year of school that a girl completes increases her future earnings, which is good for her family, her community and her country.”

To help girls get the education they deserve, add your name to the letter here.

 

A ‘Girls’ Life’ is more than looks

Leave it to Amy Schumer and Blake Lively to quietly bring attention to the casual gender stereotypes reinforced in American society.

Schumer got the ball rolling, says Motto by TIME when she took to Instagram last week to post a side-by-side image of two tween magazines, Girls’ Life and Boys’ Life (which Motto says are unaffiliated). Although Schumer’s caption only read “No,” it prompted her readers to spot the almost-blatant content differences between the two magazines.

Motto reports that the Boys’ Life cover has a “theme of ‘Explore Your Future’ (‘Astronaut? Artist? Firefighter? Chef? Here’s how to be what you want to be.’),” while the Girls’ Life  cover “promises to teach you not just how to get Your Dream Hair, but also how to Wake Up Pretty.”

Upon sharing the post, Motto says Blake Lively reposted the image to her account, writing that she “second[ed] that emotion.”

Motto reports that Karen Bokram, Girls’ Life publisher and founding editor, commented on the now-viral social media moment this way:

“‘Are we more than lip gloss and clothes? Of course,’ Bokram said, very much missing the point. ‘It’s okay to like lip gloss or be interested in fashion… I don’t know how [the problem] became ‘either you like lip gloss and clothes or you like being an astronaut.'”

Hopefully, Schumer and Lively’s comments will bring an end to antiquated gender stereotypes in the near future.

 

She Leads, You Follow: amFAR New York Gala Edition

In the middle of a season filled award shows and fashion shows alike, it’s important to dedicate some time to an important cause. And on Wednesday, Feb. 10, the stars did just that when they attended the amFAR New York Gala. The gala, which serves as the kick-off event for New York Fashion Week, also “honors individuals who have made outstanding contributions to raise awareness about the HIV/AIDS epidemic.”

Blake Lively attended the gala for a cause in an all-white ensemble, featuring silver and gold beading and pointed-toe gold heels, says ELLE. Although her dress didn’t need many accessories, her outfit’s best accessory was perhaps husband Ryan Reynolds, who donned a sharp three-piece suit for the occasion.

Following suit in contrasting number was Brazilian model Izabel Goulart, who stunned on the red carpet in a black lace gown with a scoop back, according to ELLE. The mermaid-style gown featured a dramatic train, done in black beaded lace over a nude underlay.

Changing things up in a jumpsuit was Liu Wen, a model from Yongzhou, China. Wearing a black, dolman-sleeved jumpsuit with hip cutouts, the model took a simple, yet stylish approach to gala style as she made her way down the red carpet.

Although these ladies are dressed for a black-tie gala to kick off New York Fashion Week, there is one important thing to remember from their red carpet appearances:

While  wearing clothing that fits properly and makes you feel beautiful is important, it is even more important to take the time to think about how you can make an impact on the world — whether it is by supporting a cause or an organization like amFAR or volunteering in your own community — and then setting out to make that change possible.

Fashion changes and style is fleeting, but the mark you leave on the world will hopefully be a lasting one.