Wasley injects body diversity to ‘SI Swim’

The words “body diversity” were never really associated with the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue, but thanks to increased efforts to portray all kinds of beauty, things are beginning to change.

Adding even more body diversity to this year’s edition is model Kate Wasley, a body-positivity advocate who, along with her friend and fellow model Georgia Gibbs, created the Any BODY movement to equally celebrate women of all sizes, according to PopSugar. 23-year-old Wasley is known just as much for her curves as she is for her sense of humor — and truth bombs — about beauty, says PopSugar, including her gem on bikini bodies:

“Got a bikini? Got a body? You got yourself that bikini body.”

Both Wasley and Gibbs will make their SI Swim debut when the magazine drops next month, says PopSugar, offering a double-dose of inspiring body positivity and diversity.

Model recreates Hadid’s nude photo shoot

All it takes is one person to make a difference, to highlight a different path or offer a different point of view. And model Diana Sirokai did just that in one photo.

According to PopSugar, the London-based curvy model decided to recreate a Stuart Weitzman ad featuring Gigi Hadid, in which Hadid is wearing nothing but a pair of Weitzman’s Clinger boots. In Sirokai’s version, PopSugar says the model went nude — save for a pair of black boots — and captioned her photo, “I was just wondering how a model my size would look on this.”

The result was an equally stunning photograph, one that shows that beauty is not determined by size or weight but by what projects from within: confidence, strength and inner beauty.

Way to go, Diana! Click here to see her photo.

Missguided makes inclusive new campaign

Seeing every body of every shape, size and color is always refreshing — especially when it comes in a fashion campaign.

Take Missguided, for example: called the #MakeYourMark campaign, Glamour reports that the new promos star “eight women of all sizes, skin tones, and styles,” and throughout the campaign’s webpage, quotes from each model explaining why they feel the campaign is important are included.

According to Glamour, the move towards creating the inclusive and diverse campaign comes after the company started to not Photoshop their e-commerce models’ photos, instead leaving in noticeable stretch marks and other perceived “flaws.”

Creative manager for Missguided Samantha Helligso told The Daily Mail that their focus on creating a more body positive space comes in an attempt to teach shoppers to love themselves as they are and celebrate what’s right about their bodies instead of pointing out what is “wrong” or “flawed.”

“We’re on a mission to show our audience it’s okay to be yourself, embrace your ‘flaws,’ celebrate individuality, and not strive for what the world perceives as perfection,” she said, according to Glamour. “Because basically, it doesn’t exist. By showing imagery that’s real and authentic, we want to show it’s more than okay to be yourself. All you have is what you’ve got, so own it every day.”

Amen to that! Check out photos from the campaign here.

Fenty fans flood Instagram with support

When some online tend to spew hate and put other down, leave it to Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty fans to empower each other and provide the positivity that the internet so needs.

According to PopSugar, after a fellow Fenty fan commented on an Instagram photo of the brand’s Stunna Lip Paint saying that she can only dream of wearing a bright red lip color because she’d been told that red “doesn’t suit” her because her “lips are too big,” other ‘grammers jumped in to save the day.

“Your lips are perfect, whoever told you that is dead wrong! you should get it!” one user wrote, PopSugar reports, while another told her to “Own what you have. Don’t worry about anything else…You can wear whatever you want, dont listen to anyone who says otherwise.”

Commenters weren’t the only ones to offer words of empowerment to the Fenty fan. Even the Fenty Beauty account chimed in, says PopSugar, first commenting to the fan that “This red is for EVERYONE” and then posting a screenshot of the words of encouragement and writing, “The #FENTYBEAUTY sisterhood is real!!”

Amen to that!

‘SI Swimsuit’ models rep body positivity

In the past, the words “body positivity” were the last to be associated with the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition. But this year, two models and real-life BFFs are giving us major the body positivity inspiration.

According to PopSugarGeorgia Gibbs and Kate Wasley were recently selected as the magazine’s newest swim rookies, giving them the chance to shine in the glossy’s forthcoming issue. The magazine shared the news on their Instagram account says PopSugar, wearing matching lace swimsuits set against the azure blue waters of Aruba.

The friends are also the founders of the Any.BODY, says SI, a project that aims to promote body positivity and empowerment and stems from their own experiences in being called either anorexic or overweight. Wasley explained the project to SI this way:

“It’s for anyone that’s ever felt insecure because they’re ‘too thin,’ or ‘too fat,’ have rolls, scars, cellulite or stretch marks…It’s for anyone that’s ever been told they would be beautiful if they only lost weight.”

With the model-friend duo earning spots as the magazine’s latest swim rookies — not to mention being featured side-by-side in photos — PopSugar makes the case that this “will surely show readers that there’s a place for every type of woman in the magazine.”

We couldn’t agree more.

 

 

Rihanna shares body-positive wisdom

While launching her Fenty x Puma collection at Bloomingdale’s last week, Rihanna decided to share her best body-positive wisdom at the event — aptly named a pep rally.

According to InStyle, the singer and designer shared in an interview with The Cut the way she approaches dressing her “fluctuating” figure, sharing that she has to assess her body every day to decide how to flatter it best.

“I actually have had the pleasure of a fluctuating body type, where one day I can literally fit into something that is bodycon, and then the next day—the next week—I need something oversized,” she said, according to InStyle. “I need a little crop here and a high-waist there to hide that part, you know? I really pay attention every day when I go into the closet about what’s working for my body that morning.”

Armed with this piece of advice from one of the biggest fashion icons of our time, InStyle also says Rihanna left us with another major takeaway about dressing the skin we’re in:

“I think it’s important to make sure that you wear the thing that works for your body the best, and that’s flattering.”

Amen to that!

Fonda featured on unretouched magazine cover

Beauty knows no age, and Jane Fonda’s recent magazine cover is no exception.

According to HuffPost, the Grace and Frankie star is featured on the cover of Town & Country magazine in what People reports is an unretouched photo showing Fonda in a button-down shirt and a chain-link necklace.

HuffPost says that the cover ” is the latest step in the beauty industry’s growing appreciation of older women,” which follows an Allure magazine cover featuring Helen Mirren that also announced a ban on the words “anti-aging” on their front cover.

“Whether we know it or not, [the term is] subtly reinforcing the message that aging is a condition we need to battle,” wrote Editor-in-Chief Michelle Lee, according to HuffPost. “Repeat after me: Growing older is a wonderful thing because it means that we get a chance, every day, to live a full, happy life.”

With Hollywood’s leading ladies showing us just how to own the skin we’re in, maybe the beauty and fashion industries will catch up and continue to highlight beauty at every age.

IT Cosmetics CEO champions diversity in beauty industry

If at first you don’t succeed, try again — especially when you have a mission that’s as important as promoting diversity in the beauty industry.

And that’s exactly what Jamie Kern Lima, co-founder and CEO of the wildly popular IT Cosmetics did after she was told by a prospective investor that shoppers wouldn’t purchase her makeup because of her appearance.

Recounting the tale at the Cosmetic Executive Women (CEW) Achiever Awards, Fox News said Lima explained how her company almost didn’t come to fruition: “I’m just not sure women will buy makeup from someone who looks like you, you know, with your body and your weight,” he said after hearing the pitch. But for Lima, his words weren’t the end; they were only the beginning of her pursuit to prove her naysayers wrong.

“I felt something deep down inside,” she said, according to Yahoo Lifestyle. “And it said, ‘No. You are wrong.'”

From there, Yahoo says the former news anchor, who was inspired to create IT Cosmetics because of her experience dealing with rosacea and hyperpigmentation, began pushing forward by marketing her products in ways that privileged diversity and inclusivity. Eventually, Fox News said Lima landed her big break when she appeared on QVC. “In her products launch on QVC, which sold out,” they report, “she chose models that went against the grain – a 73-year-old woman and an African American model with acne,” sticking true to her mission of representation.

But even after achieving success, Yahoo says Lima concluded her speech by saying she is not yet finished in attempting to create change in the beauty industry.

“She reminded that roomful of beauty executives — ‘the people who singlehandedly decide the images billions of women see around the world’ — to ask themselves: ‘How will these images impact your mothers, and your sisters, and how will they impact your daughters?'”

Oh, and as for that investor, Fox News says that after IT Cosmetics was acquired by L’Oreal for $1.2 billion, she heard from him again. His message?

“Congratulations. I was wrong.”

And that is how you succeed when others think you can’t.

 

Turner transforms negative perceptions into body-positive pride

When model Sophie Turner saw behind-the-scenes photos of herself from a photoshoot, the first thing she noticed was her cellulite.

“I felt disgusting,” she told People magazine. But the 22-year-old decided that her cellulite — something she had since age 12 — would no longer hold such power in her life.

“It’s something I’ve grown up with, so I thought, why should I be ashamed of it when over 90 percent of women have it?” she explained to People. “Why shouldn’t we embrace it?”

And embrace it she did. According to People, Turner decided to post the photo on Instagram in an attempt to help other women see the beauty in their own bodies. And after receiving almost 16,000 likes on the photo, it seems like she accomplished her mission.

“It’s so amazing knowing I’ve helped other women, and it makes me so happy having women who support me and want to love themselves more,” she said. “I think it’s important to love yourself.”

Amen to that, Sophie.

Getty Images implements new ban on retouched photos

Getty images is taking steps to ensure that models are accurately portrayed in photos.

According to HuffPost, the stock photo service emailed its contributors last week to inform them that, as of Oct. 1, Getty will require that “you do not submit to us any creative content depicting models whose body shapes have been retouched to make them look thinner or larger.”

HuffPost reports that the move follows a recent French law mandating that any image that feature digitally-altered models be tagged with the phrase “photographie retouchée,” or “retouched photo.” In a statement, Getty said that a major impetus behind the move was the realization that images can break stereotypes and increase tolerance and empowerment.

“…At a time when imagery is the most widely spoken global language, it has never been more important to produce and promote a visual language that is progressive and inclusive,” Getty said.

While the move is certainly a step in the right direction, HuffPost notes that the photo agency still allows photos with other altered features, such as “hair color, nose shape, skin and blemishes.”