Allbirds unveils sustainably-made flip-flops

These flip-flops are sandals you can feel good about splurging on.

Forbes says footwear brand Allbirds has launched a selection of flip-flops made from sustainable Brazilian sugar cane that aims to replace “plastic foam in traditional shoe soles, which is often made from dirty oil and is highly polluting.”

The launch of these sustainable soles follows a string of other notable releases, such as unveiling kids sizes called Smallbirds and making a line of “‘tree’ runners and loungers made from eucalyptus fiber,” Forbes says their latest launch allows customers to “purchase interchangeable straps at $15 for the Japanese-inspired flip flops, which are available in four summery colorways.” The sandals themselves cost a cool $35.

Only available for a limited time, Forbes says the technology used to created these flip-flops — called Sugar Zeffers — may have a bigger impact on footwear going forward, with the company planning to make the technology available to other shoe manufacturers.

“We know there’s interest within the industry, but what we’re hopeful for is that it will expand beyond that,” co-founder Joey Zwillinger told Forbes. “There’s something about sugarcane-derived adhesives in solar panels that pieces together a green cycle that is really special.”

 

Target unveils new sustainable collection

Target seems to be doing everything right lately.

According to InStyle, the retailer just launched a sustainable collection with global style brand Accompany that includes “40 pieces from the collaboration, which include artisanal, fair-trade items from six countries across five continents.”

With pieces like herringbone throws from India for $88 and gem cuffs from Turkey for $40, InStyle says that Target and Accompany hope the collection will highlight the native craftsmanship of each country.

“Traditional crafts and indigenous methods for creating products are being lost every day, and we aim to support the livelihood and communities of these craftspeople by connecting their goods with a wide consumer base,” said Accompany’s Founder Jason Keehn in a statement. “Through our partnership with Target, we’re able to shine a spotlight on the communities creating these goods and help them continue their traditions, now and in the future.”

If this collection sounds like something you need to own a piece of, InStyle reports that the collection is currently available online and in select stores.