Ross responds to reproductive comments from critics

A woman’s plans for her future are no one’s to decide or change but her own — that’s what Tracee Ellis Ross explained in a new interview with Vanity Fair.

According to Glamour, the “Black-ish” actor detailed in the new interview persistent inquiries from fans about her reproductive plans, something she said was likely brought on by her character’s pregnancy during the show’s last season.

But regardless of her character’s pregnancy, Ross told Vanity Fair that comments about her personal decisions are none of anyone’s business.

“I literally have said to people, for real, no joke, ‘Why don’t you just get out of my womb? Like, get out of my uterus,” she said, according to Glamour. “What are you doing in there? And why are you asking those questions? And what makes you think you can ask that?'”

Glamour points out that this is not the first time Ross has had to defend her choices while also inspiring other women to do the same. In her Glamour Women of the Year Awards speech in 2017, she explained that her life is her’s to live.

“My life is mine. Those words stopped me in my tracks,” Ross said, according to Glamour. “Those words brought tears to my eyes because, yes, I’ve been living my life—but not to my own expectations. Not for me.”

May we all live our lives not for others, but for ourselves.

Read the full interview here.

‘Glamour’ goes all-female for February issue

When a magazine designed for women has most of their creative content done by men, there is a problem. That’s why Glamours latest issue features photography, styling, hair and makeup done solely by women.

On on Jan. 3 , Glamour Editor in Chief Cindi Leive published an article on the magazine’s website detailing the percentages of women contributing to the visual elements of the magazine that motivated the change.

“Only 37 percent of the photographers we were using in our own print pages were female, and 32 percent of the hairstylists. (Forty-nine percent of makeup artists were female, but dismayingly the ratio got lower as the story got bigger.)” she wrote.

Sharing that Glamour isn’t the only magazine with the issue, Leive said that she knew it was time to make a change and move toward gender parity. Beginning with their February issue, Leive wrote, “from first page to last, every photo we commissioned was created by a woman: photographers, stylists, hair, makeup, everything.”

Additionally, the magazine will make a concerted effort to increase the number of women in “creative-contributor roles” throughout the year, marking a New Year’s resolution of sorts for the glossy.

Leive closed her announcement of Glamour’s latest endeavor by pointing out that both men and women offer equally valuable contributions, ones that can only be recognized when they are given a chance to shine.

“Women and men alike can be adventurous, experimental, relatable, accessible, or wildly artistic, and our vision of fashion and beauty and life will be richer when all our voices are heard. I can’t wait for Glamour to be part of that.”

Kudos to you, Glamour.