Munn motions for end to sexual assault

With sexual misconduct at the fore of public discussion, Olivia Munn is keeping the conversation going with a brand-new essay she penned for Entertainment Weekly.

Following her own tale of being on the receiving end of sexual harassment, Glamour says the actor wrote an essay identifying the ways in which our culture must shift in order to prevent abuses of power and further sexual misconduct, starting by pointing out the root of such actions:

“In our world today—and it’s not just Hollywood, it’s the same for girls and women all over the world who have survived sexual abuse and/or harassment—abusers don’t usually get in trouble unless the victim is broken first, because the violating act alone is not damaging enough to spark society’s outrage. It’s a marathon towards self-destruction in order to gain credibility and a vicious circle of victim-blaming. When people ask how these men in powerful positions were able to hurt so many people for so many years, I look to the people at the top and ask those questions.”

Calling the issue not a women’s issue but “an abuse-of-power issue,” Glamour says Munn offered that nothing in our culture can be changed until we change the core of our institutions that breed sweeping male hegemony.

“…Until we eradicate the diseased roots of our infrastructure and make foundational, systemic changes, nothing will change,” she wrote. “We should create a zero-tolerance policy with actionable consequences for sexual assault and any other forms of abuse. Heads of studios, bosses, and CEOs should enforce equal pay because continuing to pay us less perpetuates a bias that women are inferior.”

Concluding her essay, Glamour says Munn asked that those in positions of power go against the system and work to create an inclusive and safe environment for women to grow, succeed and thrive, because after all, “We’re strong. We’re not afraid to call each other out—and we’re not afraid to call you out anymore either.”

Amen to that!

Read the full essay here.

Girl Scouts serve up message on consent

Consent is about much more than saying ‘yes’ or ‘no’ — it’s about deciding your response for yourself, feeling comfortable in your decision and not being swayed by others to act in a certain way.

A new essay released by The Girl Scouts discusses this very topic, according to Glamour; called “Reminder: She Doesn’t Owe Anyone a Hug. Not Even at the Holidays,” the essay warns parents to not force their children to “hug or kiss relatives and other people” and not make their children believe that they “owe” someone a hug by sheer virtue of their relation.

While Glamour reports that much has been made about the message the piece is sending, with some criticizing the essay for sexualizing greetings among family members, the piece makes clear that it is not about this. It is instead about not having parents impose their will on their children while letting kids decide who they feel comfortable greeting and how. An excerpt reads:

“Think of it this way, telling your child that she owes someone a hug either just because she hasn’t seen this person in a while or because they gave her a gift can set the stage for her questioning whether she ‘owes’ another person any type of physical affection when they’ve bought her dinner or done something else seemingly nice for her later in life.”

And this, says Glamour, doesn’t mean that kids won’t naturally decide to hug or kiss family and friends; the point is to not force those who are hesitant and perhaps encourage other polite ways of interaction.

As the piece so succinctly concludes, “Give your girl the space to decide when and how she wants to show affection.”

 

 

 

CoverGirl gives its mantra a makeover

It all started with the hiring of new faces; from Issa Rae to Ayesha Curry and Maye Musk, CoverGirl was slowly but strategically building something new and exciting. And now we know: CoverGirl has officially rebranded itself as the makeup of the strong and fearless.

According to Glamour, the iconic makeup brand has just changed their long-time slogan from “Easy, breezy, beautiful CoverGirl” to “I am what I make up,” marking the new mantra with an equally powerful short film filled with all the badass women they’ve featured as brand ambassadors.

Glamour succinctly described the brand’s new direction this way:

“…Its shift from sugary-sweet messaging to including more real women of substance feels incredibly needed—and incredibly now. Its point is loud and clear, makeup is for everyone.”

With a new slogan and a host of powerful women to prove it true, we cannot wait to travel this new journey with CoverGirl.

Watch the video here.

‘Fearless Girl’ remains on Wall Street

It looks like one woman has found her place on Wall Street.

According to the Huffington Post, the “Fearless Girl” statue that was placed in the famous financial district of New York City earlier this month will remain in the area until February 2018, says Mayor Bill DeBlasio.

Originally scheduled to leave her post on April 2, HuffPost says DeBlasio decided to make the statue a semi-permanent feature of Wall Street because of her message of empowering women.

“In her short time here, the Fearless Girl has fueled powerful conversations about women in leadership and inspired so many,” he said in a statement to the New York Daily NewsHuffPost reports. “Now, she’ll be asserting herself and affirming her strength even after her temporary permit expires — a fitting path for a girl who refuses to quit.”

The statue made its debut on International Women’s Day on March 8 says HuffPost, having a staring contest with the iconic Wall Street bull as she stands with her head held high and her hands firmly on her hips.

After public advocate Letitia James pushed for the statue’s permanence and a petition on Change.org to keep the statue up circulated and received over 28,000 signatures, it looks like the statue is here to stay — at least for a little while.

Lively promotes ‘girl power’ in PCAs speech

When Blake Lively won a People’s Choice Award at the Jan. 18 event, she used the moment to give a speech that encouraged young girls to shed any limitations placed on them.

According to Entertainment Weekly, after winning a PCA for Favorite Dramatic Movie Actress, Lively shared words of wisdom passed down to her from her mother:

“My mom, she always taught me as a kid that you can’t ever let anyone limit you. Don’t ever let anyone tell you there’s something you can’t do,” she said.

Sharing that as a child, she wanted to meet the Spice Girls, EW says the actress told the audience what she learned from idolizing the girl group. “What was so neat about them was that they’re all do distinctly different, and they were women, and they owned who they were, and that was my first introduction into girl power,” Lively said.

With her award, Lively contended that a vote for the Favorite Actress category was a vote for girl power. “Watching this movie, and the women nominated in this category — when you guys voted for this, you didn’t just vote for this movie or me, but you voted for girl power,” Lively said, according to EW. “And men voted for girl power, too, and you guys are awesome for doing that.”

Adding that her win and her peers’ nominations proves that people “want to hear stories about women,” Lively concluded her speech by calling on fans to share their stories, because “You need to be heard, you are valuable, and no one can limit you!”

What feminism means to me

As I follow the Women’s Marches around the United States and around the world today, I cannot help but reflect upon hundreds of thousands of people — likely millions — gathered in support of a just, equal society for all. I am proud of the women and men that are demonstrating peacefully, standing in solidarity for their fellow human beings.

But I also wish that I could have physically participated in a march. And that, dear friends, has spurred me to write, something that for me has always felt powerful and assertive and, in many ways, makes me feel connected to those participating in demonstrations today. My words are printed; they are permanent. And the permanence of my words feels like the promise of permanent change — the very goal of these marches.

But what also gives me power is feminism. I am a feminist. I believe in the social, economic and political equality of the sexes, as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s definition of feminism posits. I believe in a feminism that is inclusive of all women: straight, non-binary and LGBTQ+ women, women of all races, income levels, locations and circumstances.

I believe these things because I have felt the power in women supporting women, and I have seen how such support can embolden women to speak their minds, to own their bodies and assert their presence. I have come to believe these things because I have come to see their fruitful results.

So for me, feminism is not merely an assumed ideology or a lofty set of beliefs. To me, feminism is sticking up for your fellow woman, fighting not only for yourself but on behalf of your sister. It is empowering her, supporting her and pushing her to achieve her full potential.

It means securing the equality and liberties due to women of all circumstances without taking away from our male counterparts; it means serving as equals, knowing that there is enough of the proverbial “pie” to go around.

It means encouraging our mothers, sisters, friends, daughters and fellow women to respect their bodies, brains and hearts — and commanding others to respect them just the same.

It means teaching girls that they can do anything boys can, and teaching boys that being sensitive or contemplative is just as good as (or perhaps better than) being tough.

To me, feminism isn’t just about women. It’s about all of us. Because when one group succeeds, we all succeed.

XO,

Nicole