Luxury hijabs hit high-fashion world

Sometimes, the best ideas are born from personal experiences. Such is the case with Melanie Elturk, CEO of Haute Hijab.

When she was growing up, Elturk “found it hard to find hijabs that made her feel confident,” according to ELLE, owning two hijabs that made her feel “anything but beautiful.” On a mission to make a change, ELLE says Elturk collected vintage silk scarves and by 2010, founded Haute Hijab, which is dedicated to offering stylish, beautiful hijabs for Muslim women.

With paisley, leopard and floral-printed hijabs — along with beautiful solid styles — presenting a selection of everyday hijabs for only $20, Elturk certainly accomplished her goal of providing beautiful, yet affordable hijab styles for Muslim women. But now, Elturk is taking that mission one step further with her brand-new luxury line.

ELLE reports that the five-piece collection features hand-crafted hijabs made from “100 percent silk, Swarovski crystals, hand-cut lace and other embellishments,” and retail between $250 and $325. With styles like the “Black Tie Lace” offering a silk construction with a tulle overlay and hand-embellished organza flowers, it’s hard not to notice the care and detail with which the line was crafted.

Most of all, however, it seems like the line speaks not only to Elturk’s original mission, but also her vision for the future.

“Our generation has the opportunity to redefine what it means to be Muslim-American,” she writes on her website, “and through your unique stories and successes, we’re contributing to a new mindset where hijab and American are not mutually exclusive but rather, exist in harmony as part of a greater American multicultural mosaic.”

To shop Haute Hijab, click here.

L’Oreal model brings hijab into mainstream advertising

The beauty industry has hit another major milestone, thanks to L’Oreal.

In the global beauty brand’s ad campaign for their Elvive line, L’Oreal is featuring British beauty blogger Amena Khan, who, by starring in the ad, is making history as the ” first hijab-wearing woman to be featured in a major mainstream hair ad,” according to Glamour.

But beyond making history, Glamour reports that Khan helps the beauty industry challenge the misconception that women whose hair is covered don’t take care of it. In fact, Khan told Vogue UK it is quite the opposite.

“You have to wonder—why is it presumed that women who don’t show their hair don’t look after it?” she said. “The opposite of that would be that everyone that does show their hair only looks after it for the sake of showing it to others. And that mindset strips us of our autonomy and our sense of independence. Hair is a big part of self-care.”

Portraying an expanded definition of beauty, destroying misconceptions and giving a platform to those who are normally underportrayed in the media — all of these things, Khan said, are implicit in her ad spot for L’Oreal.

“How many brands are doing things like this? Not many,” she asserted. “They’re literally putting a girl in a headscarf—whose hair you can’t see—in a hair campaign. Because what they’re really valuing through the campaign is the voices that we have.”

 

Aden poses for Allure

Halima Aden is only 19 years old, but that doesn’t mean she can’t slay like the big-time models. Judging by her new cover for Allure magazine, Aden did just fine — and even made history in the process.

According to HuffPost, after “becoming the first Miss Minnesota contestant to compete in a hijab and burkini in November 2016,” Aden earned another first, this time becoming the first cover star for Allure to wear a hijab.

But this isn’t the only history the young model has made thus far: HuffPost reports that Aden “became Vogue’s first hijab-wearing model in June and walked the Yeezy show in February,” only just beginning to cement her place in the fore of the American beauty and fashion industries.

Posing in a Nike hijab and a red, white and blue hoodie, Aden’s gorgeous cover photo for Allure is accompanied by the headline “This Is American Beauty.” HuffPost explains that while the magazine intend to make a political statement with Aden’s photos, the spread comes at a time when the public forum is filled with talk of travel bans and hate crimes directed toward Muslims.

For Aden herself, HuffPost says the model shared with Allure that wearing the hijab shields her from negative comments about her looks.

“‘I have much more to offer than my physical appearance, and a hijab protects me against ‘You’re too skinny,’ ‘You’re too thick,’ ‘Look at her hips,’ ‘Look at her thigh gap.'”

To learn more about Aden and see her Allure photo spread, click here.

 

H&M ‘Closes the Loop’

H&M is known for their modern, street-style aesthetic along with their affordable collaborations with high-fashion designers. And now, the retailer can add something else to its name — they are the first to feature a muslim model in their latest fashion campaign.

According to Marie Claire, H&M has placed hijab-wearing model Mariah Idrissi at the forefront of their “Close the Loop” campaign, which also features Iggy Pop and size-26 model Tess Holliday along with “an amputee model, transgender model and group of Sikh men.” However, Idrissi has caused quite a buzz with her appearance in the campaign.

Marie Claire says that Idrissi spoke about her role in the campaign to Fusion, explaining that she isn’t sure why she has garnered such attention for her part in the initiative. Venturing to explain the attention over her ads, she said, “It might be because hijab fashion has boomed in the last few years and to finally see a hijabi [a woman who wears a hijab] in mainstream fashion is a big achievement.”

The 23-year-old Idrissi started wearing a hijba at the age of 17, and asked her parents for permission to star in the ad, in which she worked with mostly female staff members.

However, Marie Claire reports that Idrissi found the H&M staff to be accommodating to her during the shoot, telling Fusion that the staff was very respectful. “If the cameramen noticed something not quite right, they would call a woman over to fix me, it was sweet,” she explained to Fusion. “One of the watches was dangling in the wrong way, and rather than just twisting it on my wrist, the cameraman asked a woman to come over. It just showed that little bit of respect.”

And we’re certainly glad it all worked out. So thank you, H&M and Mariah Idrissi, for showing us that beauty and fashion are not reserved for the mainstream.