Ross reveals power of women’s fury in TED Talk

Hell hath no fury like a woman — and that fury has deep roots, according to Tracee Ellis Ross.

According to HuffPost, the actor recently gave a TED Talk at the organization’s annual conference in Vancouver, Canada on “the spectrum of objectification women have faced for hundreds of years, and the anger women harbor because of it.” What’s more, HuffPost says Ross explained in her 10-minute talk that this anger should be embraced.

“Women, I encourage you to acknowledge your fury,” she said. “Give it language. Share it in safe places of identification and in safe ways. Your fury is not something to be afraid of. It holds lifetimes of wisdom. Let it breathe and listen.”

Opening her speech with a story of a female friend who was physically moved by a man who was trying to reach something she was blocking, HuffPost says Ross used the anecdotes as a launch pad to explain the depth and extent of the rage women feel, offering that her friend’s fury was “ignited by lifetimes of men helping themselves to women’s bodies without consent.”

To make the experience more relatable to male listeners, HuffPost says Ross equated it to having a stranger take your phone out of your hand’s every day, and having the stranger explain away their reasoning for taking the phone in the first place.

“Somehow, no one ever talks about the person who took the cellphone,” Ross explained. “Men are so used to helping themselves, that it’s like … [shrugging] they can’t help themselves. And not because men are fundamentally less moral, but because this is a very big blind spot for most men.”

After stating that her friend’s fury — and that of countless women around the world — “holds centuries of never being able to directly address or express [women’s] indignation, our frustration and our rage,” HuffPost says Ross concluded her talk with two very powerful words as of late: “time’s up.”

“Time’s up on women being held responsible for men’s bad behavior,” she said. “It is men’s responsibility to change men’s bad behavior.”

Watch her TED Talk in full right here.

Walking in style

Adrianne Haslet was not only a model of clothing on March 24 when she walked down a fashion show runway; she was also a model of strength.

According to Bustle, the Boston Marathon Bombing survivor opened a “body positive Vancouver Fashion Week show,” taking her turn down the runway to represent #BeBodyAware, a collaboration between Toronto-based designer Lesley Hampton and plus model Tia Duffy’s Be Body Aware Project, which aims to promote diversity in the fashion world.

Following the bombing, Haslet — a professional ballroom dancer — lost her left leg below the knee, says Bustle, and now serves as a motivational speaker. But for Hampton and her body-positive collaboration, Haslet didn’t need to utter a word to be an inspiration. Hampton explained to CBC News how she asked Haslet to walk in her show this way:

“I sent her an email,” she said. “I was just like, ‘I love your story. I’m so inspired. ‘Would you be interested in coming to walk for my show?’ And she replied right away, and was like, ‘That’s incredible, absolutely.’ And she’s flying all the way in from Boston.”

And the feeling is mutual; Bustle said Haslet offered that her willingness to participate in the show was a celebration of the ways her mission aligns with Hampton’s.

“She represented models of all body types on her runway,” she said. “It is my life’s work to show other amputees that they can do anything. We are not broken, we are simply missing pieces.”

Well said, Adrianne.

Sandberg wants girls to keep an eye on leadership

Sheryl Sandberg doesn’t want girls to think that leadership roles are only for boys. That’s why in the January issue of National Geographic, the Facebook COO asserted that girls need to believe in the power of their potential.

According to The Cut, Sandberg had this to say on the importance of encouraging girls to pursue leadership positions both big and small:

“‘Raise your hand if you’re a girl in class,’ she said. ‘Run for class president. If you’re interested in it, be a leader. Don’t let the world tell you girls can’t lead.’ She added that imposing gender roles on children pigeonholes them from an early age: ‘From the moment they’re born, boys and girls are treated according to stereotypes. We tell little boys, ‘Don’t cry like a girl.’ Not helpful.'”

Interviewed separately for the same issue of NatGeoThe Cut reports that Gloria Steinem echoed Sandberg’s thoughts, saying that it’s important to raise children in a way that that puts them on a level playing field in the future.

“It’s important for girls not to internalize a sense of passivity or inferiority or second-classness, and for boys not to internalize a sense of having to be stronger or superior or in control.”

Amen to that.

Built on the shoulders of giants

It’s hard to reflect on the career of Serena Williams and not be inspired. Sports Illustrated reports that not only has she been ranked No. 1 in the world for the past four years, she also has six Wimbledon singles titles (just to name a few of her many accolades) — and she’s a fierce advocate for women, often speaking on body positivity and women’s rights. So seeing Williams as a role model of strength, perseverance and skill both on and off the court is quite an easy task — just ask Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas.

According to TIME’Mottothe 20-year-old gold medalist told Teen Vogue about her journey to the get the gold for their August issue, explaining that believing in herself didn’t always come easily. “It took a long time for me to see my own potential — a long time,” Douglas told Teen Vogue, according to Motto.

Even after her gold-medal wins in the individual all-around and team competitions — which, Motto says, made her the first American gymnast to achieve such a feat — Douglas was still not the confident competitor and woman we see today. Teen Vogue reports that she was persistently bullied over her appearance, something that will eat at anyone’s self-esteem.

“Sometimes I would be in the bathroom, bawling my eyes out, wanting to quit,” Douglas told Teen Vogue, according to Motto. “I felt like I was all alone. But when I came through it, I felt as if I could overcome anything.”

Cue Williams, who became Douglas’ source of inspiration. Motto says Douglas’ mother, Natalie Hawkins, explained to Teen Vogue how her daughter came to draw strength from the legendary tennis player.

“I remember when everyone was talking about her arms, and she became very self-conscious about how muscular they were,” Hawkins told Teen Vogue. “Then Gabrielle saw the elegance with which Serena Williams handled all the negative criticism of her own body. It was liberating for my daughter to see that. She said, ‘I don’t have to apologize to anyone about my body. My body is beautiful.'”