‘Glamour’ goes all-female for February issue

When a magazine designed for women has most of their creative content done by men, there is a problem. That’s why Glamours latest issue features photography, styling, hair and makeup done solely by women.

On on Jan. 3 , Glamour Editor in Chief Cindi Leive published an article on the magazine’s website detailing the percentages of women contributing to the visual elements of the magazine that motivated the change.

“Only 37 percent of the photographers we were using in our own print pages were female, and 32 percent of the hairstylists. (Forty-nine percent of makeup artists were female, but dismayingly the ratio got lower as the story got bigger.)” she wrote.

Sharing that Glamour isn’t the only magazine with the issue, Leive said that she knew it was time to make a change and move toward gender parity. Beginning with their February issue, Leive wrote, “from first page to last, every photo we commissioned was created by a woman: photographers, stylists, hair, makeup, everything.”

Additionally, the magazine will make a concerted effort to increase the number of women in “creative-contributor roles” throughout the year, marking a New Year’s resolution of sorts for the glossy.

Leive closed her announcement of Glamour’s latest endeavor by pointing out that both men and women offer equally valuable contributions, ones that can only be recognized when they are given a chance to shine.

“Women and men alike can be adventurous, experimental, relatable, accessible, or wildly artistic, and our vision of fashion and beauty and life will be richer when all our voices are heard. I can’t wait for Glamour to be part of that.”

Kudos to you, Glamour.

Dunham and Kirke pose for new lingerie campaign

There’s nothing like a healthy dose of body positivity to get your week started — and leave it to Girls stars Lena Dunham and Jemima Kirke to deliver.

According to Motto by TIME, the actresses star in a new ad campaign for Lonely, a New Zealand underwear company that “celebrates the strength and individuality of women and creates lingerie, swimwear and clothing that embraces and empowers them.”

Dunham and Kirke look stunning as they model the sexy lingerie styles for the campaign, which Motto says is part of the brand’s “Lonely Girls Campaign, a series of Photoshop-free photographs of women wearing the brand in their own spaces as a rebuke traditional lingerie advertising.”

Motto reports the underwear company explained in a statement to Dazed the mission of the campaign, as well as the decision to feature the duo:

“Instead of being objectified, the women who participate in these campaigns—in this case, Lena and Jemima—are empowered and exhibit real beauty that will hopefully help women everywhere feel a little more liberated.”

Amen to that.