Miss America announces first all-female leadership team

Miss America has just made history, but not in the form of a contestant or winner.

According to CNN, the organization has just appointed an all-female leadership for the first time in its history. Led by all former pageant winners, CNN reports that Miss America has named Regina Hopper as president and CEO, while “Marjorie Vincent-Tripp was named as chair of the Board of Trustees of the Miss America Foundation.”

Hopper and Vincent-Tripp join former Fox News personality Gretchen Carlson who, in December, was named the chairman of the Miss America Organization’s Board of Trustees. Taking over for leaders who resigned in 2017 over disparaging emails, CNN says the organization hopes the their new leadership team will usher in a new era:

“The induction of this all female leadership team signals forthcoming transformational changes to the entire organization and program, ushering in a new era of progressiveness, inclusiveness and empowerment,” the organization said in a statement.
Amen to that!

Reformation features female leaders in new campaign

Female leaders are models, both literally and figuratively — and in this all-new campaign by Reformation, these women are actually the models of the brand’s latest styles.

According to GlamourReformation decided to ditch traditional fashion models for their holiday campaign and instead opt for “women who are leaders in a variety of male-dominated fields to front its campaign, bringing a new meaning to power-dressing.”

Fashionista reports that one — Kirsten — is the founder of an e-commerce venture capital firm, while another — Kate — is a branch chief of operations for engineering at a space agency, among others in different industries, sharing in a release that they strategically chose women in fields that are “notorious for under-representing the ladies.”

Reformation founder Yael Aflalo explained to Glamour the company’s decision to cast the women in this way:

“We’ve always admired like-minded women who get sh*t done and make a big impact in whatever field they’re in…So we wanted to celebrate a group of ladies who share that passion for leadership and change.”

Sharing that the campaign aims to bring a new meaning to the term “power dressing,” Aflalo told Glamour that it’s all about wearing pieces that make you feel confident.

“We do think clothes have the power to make you feel a bit more confident,” Aflalo said. “Power dressing is not as much about what you’re wearing, like a business suit vs a backless dress, but more about how it makes you feel.”

Shop the collection here.

García to be new EIC of ELLE

Time for a little upgrade for Marie Claire‘s Nina García.

According to WWD, García is set to become the glossy’s newest editor in chief following the sudden departure of Robbie Myers. Previously, García served as the fashion director at ELLE from 2000 to 2008, says The Cut, while she most recently acted as the creative director for Marie Claire.

Speaking on her new position, García shared in the announcement that she is excited to return to her roots at ELLE and help launch it into the future.

Elle is close to my heart, and this is a very special homecoming,” she said, according to WWD. “This is Elle’s moment to be out in front, inspiring and informing readers in every area. Fashion and beauty are at Elle’s core, as are culture, politics, health and new media. I’m excited to work with this incredibly talented team to set the pace for women who are moving as fast as the times we live in.”

Congrats, Nina! We are rooting for you!

Sandberg wants girls to keep an eye on leadership

Sheryl Sandberg doesn’t want girls to think that leadership roles are only for boys. That’s why in the January issue of National Geographic, the Facebook COO asserted that girls need to believe in the power of their potential.

According to The Cut, Sandberg had this to say on the importance of encouraging girls to pursue leadership positions both big and small:

“‘Raise your hand if you’re a girl in class,’ she said. ‘Run for class president. If you’re interested in it, be a leader. Don’t let the world tell you girls can’t lead.’ She added that imposing gender roles on children pigeonholes them from an early age: ‘From the moment they’re born, boys and girls are treated according to stereotypes. We tell little boys, ‘Don’t cry like a girl.’ Not helpful.'”

Interviewed separately for the same issue of NatGeoThe Cut reports that Gloria Steinem echoed Sandberg’s thoughts, saying that it’s important to raise children in a way that that puts them on a level playing field in the future.

“It’s important for girls not to internalize a sense of passivity or inferiority or second-classness, and for boys not to internalize a sense of having to be stronger or superior or in control.”

Amen to that.