Plus models take stand at London Fashion Week

Creating major change comes from the inside out — and that’s exactly what’s happening in the fashion industry.

According to Glamour, model Hayley Hasselhoff led a group of her model peers in a protest during London Fashion Week. Glamour reports that in union with a “campaign organized by plus-size fashion retailer Simply Be, the 25-year-old model and seven others posed in their underwear outside the London Fashion Week hub,” holding signs that said “‘Love Your Curves,’ ‘Curves Shouldn’t Mean Compromise,’ and ‘LFW—Where Are the Curves? according to the Evening Standard.”

Hasselhoff said that the move aimed to show that beauty comes in every size, despite the fashion industry’s tendency to portray only a slim standard of beauty.

“We want to give women everywhere the confidence to be who they are. This is only achieved by showing a wide variety of models, irrespective of size,” she said, according to Glamour. “By tearing up the one-size-fits fashion rule book, we hope to encourage any woman, whatever her size, to feel fabulous in their skin.”

Chief executive of the parent company of Simply Be Angela Spindler explained, however, that in an attempt to break down such rigid depictions of beauty to allow room for more, they aren’t about to resort to body shaming to achieve their goal.

“This isn’t about ‘skinny shaming’,” she said, Glamour reports. “We think that shape should be celebrated irrespective of size, and it’s time that the industry became more diverse—after all, fashion is for everyone.”

Amen to that.

Missguided makes inclusive new campaign

Seeing every body of every shape, size and color is always refreshing — especially when it comes in a fashion campaign.

Take Missguided, for example: called the #MakeYourMark campaign, Glamour reports that the new promos star “eight women of all sizes, skin tones, and styles,” and throughout the campaign’s webpage, quotes from each model explaining why they feel the campaign is important are included.

According to Glamour, the move towards creating the inclusive and diverse campaign comes after the company started to not Photoshop their e-commerce models’ photos, instead leaving in noticeable stretch marks and other perceived “flaws.”

Creative manager for Missguided Samantha Helligso told The Daily Mail that their focus on creating a more body positive space comes in an attempt to teach shoppers to love themselves as they are and celebrate what’s right about their bodies instead of pointing out what is “wrong” or “flawed.”

“We’re on a mission to show our audience it’s okay to be yourself, embrace your ‘flaws,’ celebrate individuality, and not strive for what the world perceives as perfection,” she said, according to Glamour. “Because basically, it doesn’t exist. By showing imagery that’s real and authentic, we want to show it’s more than okay to be yourself. All you have is what you’ve got, so own it every day.”

Amen to that! Check out photos from the campaign here.

Hadid teams up with Stuart Weitzman for new shoe collaboration

Celebrity shoe collections seem to be a dime a dozen these days, but none are quite like the latest collaboration between Gigi Hadid and Stuart Weitzman.

According to Harper’s Bazaar, the model worked alongside the famed shoe company’s new creative director, Giovanni Morelli, to create a line of mules that “reflect her own fashion sensibility.” So far, the collaboration offers two styles, says Harper’s Bazaar, which include “the EyeLove (in ballet and deep indigo suede, with one eye motif) and the EyeLoveMore (in frosted grey suede with multiple eyes) – each lined with shearling.”

Working off of an evil eye motif, Hadid told Bazaar that adding the symbol to her shoe designs is about much more than making a fashion statement.

“The evil eye is a powerful symbol meant to protect those who wear it from negative energies,” she said. “It’s emotionally comforting and beautiful and captivating to look at.”

While pieces from the line are not modest — they range from about $638 (£480) to about $765 (£575) — the collection isn’t all about high fashion and high price tags. In fact, Bazaar says that the line continues their long-standing relationship with Pencils of Promise, a non-profit organization that “aims to increase educational opportunities in the developing world.” The Hadid and Weitzman collection has already committed $105,000, says Bazaar, which will help build schools in Ghana, Guatemala and Laos.

Fashion and philanthropy — what could get better!

Getty Images implements new ban on retouched photos

Getty images is taking steps to ensure that models are accurately portrayed in photos.

According to HuffPost, the stock photo service emailed its contributors last week to inform them that, as of Oct. 1, Getty will require that “you do not submit to us any creative content depicting models whose body shapes have been retouched to make them look thinner or larger.”

HuffPost reports that the move follows a recent French law mandating that any image that feature digitally-altered models be tagged with the phrase “photographie retouchée,” or “retouched photo.” In a statement, Getty said that a major impetus behind the move was the realization that images can break stereotypes and increase tolerance and empowerment.

“…At a time when imagery is the most widely spoken global language, it has never been more important to produce and promote a visual language that is progressive and inclusive,” Getty said.

While the move is certainly a step in the right direction, HuffPost notes that the photo agency still allows photos with other altered features, such as “hair color, nose shape, skin and blemishes.”

 

Graham gives fashion week advice

Ashely Graham knows a thing or two about injecting a bit of body diversity into the fashion industry, and at this season’s New York Fashion Week, she truly outdid herself by featuring all body types on the runway of her lingerie show for Addition Elle. But, the trailblazing model wishes she could say the same for other fashion shows.

According to Cosmopolitan, Graham told Yahoo Style that Rihanna’s Fenty x Puma show should have added curvier models to their already diverse lineup walking down the runway.

“I was at Fenty last night, and that was an amazing show. But how dope would it have been to see some curves on the runway?” she said, before adding that “it was a very diverse group of women, which was really nice.”

Hopefully, with more people like Graham speaking out on the lack of body diversity in the fashion industry, things will finally begin to change.

 

Diversity in fashion industry surpasses runway shows

The fashion industry inches closer to increased diversity every year, but this year, a new milestone was reached.

According to TheFashionSpot‘s Diversity Report, “fall ad campaigns were considered ‘more diverse’ than previous seasons when it comes to race representation, with models of color representing 30.4 percent of all female models cast,” Bustle reports. Examining 187 major fall campaigns which used a total of 457 female models, the report found that for the first time ever, fashion ads were more inclusive than runway shows.

Here are a few other noteworthy findings from TheFashionSpot‘s report:

  • The percentage of non-white models used in Fall 2017 campaigns increased to 30.4 percent, a 5.9 percent jump from the previous season and the site’s highest recorded increase to date.
  • Plus-size models starring in fashion ad campaigns experienced the slightest dip — 0.1 percent — to a measly 2.2 percent total, as plus models “accounted for just 10 of the 457 castings.”
  • Fall 2017 campaigns saw an increase in usage of both older models and transgender models, with 14 and six casting respectively out of a total 457 models cast.

TheFashionSpot‘s report also highlights the most and least diverse campaigns overall, notes Saint Laurent, Coach and Christian Dior as among the most diverse Fall 2017 campaigns, each boasting a rate of non-white models above 60 percent.

While there is clearly still work to be done in creating an inclusive and diverse fashion industry, every small step leads us to a more representative future.

New Zara campaign stars only models over 40

Women are beautiful at every age, and thanks to a new campaign by Zara, this sentiment is being proven yet again.

According to PopSugar, the Spanish retailer’s campaign for their  Fall and Winter 2017 collection features only models over the age of 40, all of whom show off Zara’s forthcoming styles. Part of the “Timeless Woman” campaign are Malgosia Bela (40), Kristina de Coninck (53) and Yasmin Warsame (41), all of whom PopSugar says have been in the fashion industry “for years” and “have walked for high-end designers, but this campaign sheds new light on the brand and on the topic of ageism in the fashion industry.”

With years in an ever-changing industry under their belts, the models’ individual styles have also progressed — and so has the way they view themselves.

“I prefer myself so much better now than ten years ago or 20 years ago,” Bela said, according to PopSugar. “Obviously it would be nice not to get old and ugly, but the mental process is only for the better. So, it’s a paradox: more confidence, and you are getting old. But it’s . . . I kind of like it.”

If only we could shop for her confidence and perspective just like we can shop the new collection here.

Unretouched models abound in new Asos swimwear photos

If you’re worried about showing some skin at the beach this Fourth of July, Asos is here to tell you to celebrate your imperfections.

In fact, that’s exactly what models in their swimwear photos did. According to InStyle the retailer featured “models with stretch marks, acne scars, and birthmarks on their website,” refusing to edit their photos to make them blemish-free.

With the photos showcasing each model’s natural beauty, InStyle says Twitter was abuzz over the photos, with many tweeting their praise of the company.

Twitter user @Kelly_Horrigan showed her support by sharing, “round of applause to ASOS for not editing out their models stretch marks, finally realistic body images are being promoted, so beautiful 👏🏻💖.”

 

Lawrence illuminates the illusions of retouched photos

Retouching photos sounds harmless, but when it completely alters one’s appearance, it can be damaging — just as Iskra Lawrence.

According to HuffPost, the Aerie model recently took to Instagram to share a side-by-side photo of herself; wearing nothing but lingerie, Lawrence not only looks flawless, she also doesn’t even look like herself. Although HuffPost says Lawrence noted she was a few sizes smaller in the photos anyway, the point still remains: Photoshop can produce completely unrealistic results.

“That smooth a$$ skin? Not mine ― a computer programme did that. The full thick hair ― extensions,” she wrote, according to HuffPost. “…Waist + legs + arms slimmed with a photoshop tool. No eye bags, well actually no nothing that makes me resemble the real me. And the WORST thing about it… I WANTED TO LOOK LIKE THIS!!!”

Sharing that at the time, she thought that “I had ‘perfected’ images (like the ones I saw of other models) that I would book more jobs” and thus she would be “happy and successful,” HuffPost says Lawrence revealed that the images were ultimately damaging to her psyche.

“In reality seeing retouched images of myself gave me even more insecurities and body image issues because I couldn’t even look like or relate to the image of myself!” she wrote.

So what did the body positivity advocate learn?

“What’s real is YOU, your imperfectly perfect self that’s what makes you magical, unique and beautiful.”

Amen to that.

 

 

 

Body-positive documentary to air June 21

TV is about to get a little more body positive, thanks to a brand-new documentary.

According to Glamour, a documentary called Straight/Curve will make its debut on EPIX on June 21. The film, which Glamour says “aims to redefine the beauty and size standards enforced by the fashion industry,” features prominent models like Iskra Lawrence, Denise Bidot and Charli Howard, all in an attempt to change the fashion industry.

Sharing their own struggles with body image issues, Glamour reports director Jenny McQuaile said the models help to shed light on a complex fashion environment, as the film examines “the misconceptions around health and size, body shame, the lack of diversity in fashion and media, and the limited scope of education in fashion schools, among other issues.”

Glamour also notes that the film features “Project Runway‘s Tim Gunn, and Chromat designer Becca McCharen, as well as Claire Mysko, CEO of the National Eating Disorders Association—all of whom are important in rounding out this conversation.”

Catch the film at 8 p.m. on EPIX on June 21.