Hernandez gets ‘Shero’ Barbie

We’re doing backflips for Mattel’s latest ‘Shero’ doll.

According to HuffPost, Olympic gold medal-winning gymnast Laurie Hernandez now has a Barbie in her likeness created especially for Mattel’s “Shero” line, which already includes dolls modeled after “director Ava DuVernay, dancer Misty Copeland and fellow Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas and fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad.”

Fully posable, HuffPost says the doll also comes with two leotards and a gym bag, making the doll a perfect mini-me of the gymnast. As for Hernandez, having the doll made in her image was nothing short of a golden moment.

“I was so excited to know that I would have a Barbie that looks like me,” she told HuffPost. “It’s such an honor knowing that I’m a Barbie Shero along with many other incredible women like Misty Copeland and Ashley Graham. I am so excited that kids are going to be able to grow up with people that I looked up to as well, and hopefully they can see me as an inspiration too.”

We’re excited that kids can look up to someone like Hernandez, too.

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Barbie unveils new dolls in ‘Inspiring Women’ line

Kids everywhere are about to get some new — and some time-honored — heroes to play make-believe with and look up to.

According to HuffPost, Mattel is adding a host of dolls to their new “Inspiring Women” Barbie collection, which honors women who have made history in their respective fields and industries. This new line includes the likes of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, the first female aviator to journey across the Atlantic Ocean Amelia Earhart and boundary-breaker in science and math for NASA Katherine Johnson.

While this line of dolls does not have an anticipated release date, HuffPost says the company is also adding 14 new dolls to their existing “Shero” line, this time honoring modern women who are making a name for themselves in the United States and around the world.

Glamour reports these new inductees include: Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins; U.S. Olympic gold medal snowboarder Chloe Kim; Australian conservationist Bindi Irwin; British boxing champion Nicola Adams; Turkish windsurger Çağla Kubat; French chef Hélène Darroze; Chinese volleyball champion Hui Ruoqi; German designer and entrepreneur Leyla Piedayesh; Mexican pro-golfer Lorena Ochoa; Polish journalist Martyna Wojciechowska; Italian soccer player Sara Gama; Chinese actor and philanthropist Xiaotong Guan; Chinese prima ballerina Yuan Yuan Tan; and Spanish entrepreneur and fashion designer Vicky Martin Berrocal.

Senior Vice president and General Manager of Barbie Lisa McKnight said in a release that the dolls aim to teach girls — and all children — to reach for the stars and dream beyond what they see is presently possible, not just on International Women’s Day, but every day.

“As a brand that inspires the limitless potential in girls, Barbie will be honoring its largest line up of role models timed to International Women’s Day, because we know that you can’t be what you can’t see,” she said, according to HuffPost. “Girls have always been able to play out different roles and careers with Barbie and we are thrilled to shine a light on real life role models to remind them that they can be anything.”

Shop Barbie’s “Inspiring Women” collection here.

Kim makes Olympic history with gold medal win

One U.S. snowboarder made Olympic history with her recent gold medal win.

According to E! Online, Team USA snowboarder Chloe Kim earned a score just shy of perfection (98.25) in the women’s halfpipe competition, securing for herself and the U.S. a gold medal victory.

But in the process, Kim made history, becoming the youngest woman ever to medal in snowboarding — at the age of 17.

“I worked so hard to get to this point and just coming here and being able to land was my main goal,” Chloe said, according to E!. “I was so happy I could do it and take home the gold…My family has sacrificed so much for me and accomplish this dream of mine. Being able to do that in their home country is amazing.”

Now that’s a champion!

History-making U.S. Olympic speedskater advances in Winter Games

The first black woman on the U.S. Olympic speedskating team is skating her way into success.

According to HuffPost, Maame Biney advanced in “the 500-meter short-track event with a veteran-like performance in the first round at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.” Finishing second in her debut heat with a time of 43.665 seconds, HuffPost reports that Biney was able to secure her spot while fending off third-place finisher Kim Alang.

Biney is set to also compete in the 1,500-meter skate, so with several competitions under her belt and headed her way, she told HuffPost that for her, this experience is all about having fun.

“I don’t really feel pressure to be the first to get a medal or anything like that,” she said. “I just want to go out there, do my best and have fun, and experience the Olympics. That’s what I’m here for. I’m here to win, obviously, but also have fun.”

Solo seeks presidency of U.S. Soccer

She’s a World Cup winner and an Olympic champion, and now, former U.S. Soccer goalkeeper Hope Solo is looking to add another item to her resume: president.

According to ABC News, Solo took to Facebook to announce her candidacy for president of the U.S. Soccer Federation, following a recent announcement by current president Sunil Gulati of his decision to not pursue a fourth term. While the former goalie was suspended from the U.S. Women’s National team following comments about their World Cup semifinal opponents, ABC reports that Solo says she has exactly what it takes to lead the federation:

“I know exactly what U.S. Soccer needs to do, I know exactly how to do it, and I possess the fortitude to get it done,” she wrote. “I have always been willing to sacrifice for what I believe in and I believe there is no greater sacrifice then fighting for equal opportunity, integrity and honesty, especially in an organization like the USSF that could give so much more to our communities across the nation.”

So, what’s her campaign platform? ABC says Solo not only wants to foster a culture of winning and transparency within the federation, she also wants to “push for equal pay for the women’s national team and all women within U.S. Soccer” and “address the ‘pay-to-play’ model and make soccer accessible to all.”

Solo isn’t the only female running for the position, however, with ABC reporting that Soccer United Marketing President Kathy Carter also threw her hat in the ring for the February election.

Raisman raises standards on body shaming

Girls are strong, and if you can’t see it, get over it — that’s the message behind Olympian Aly Raisman’s latest string of tweets directed at some very rude body shamers.

According to For The WinRaisman shared a recent encounter with some less-than-friendly TSA agents who identified her by her muscles and continued to comment on her appearance. Raisman tweeted that while one said she “recognized [her] by [her] biceps,” the other male TSA agent said he didn’t see her muscles and then proceeded to stare at the gymnast.

Calling the situation “rude and uncomfortable,” Raisman went on to school everyone on what body shaming means.

“I work very hard to be healthy & fit. The fact that a man thinks he judge my arms pisses me off I am so sick of this judgmental generation,” she tweeted. “If u are a man who can’t compliment a girls [muscles] you are sexist. Get over yourself. Are u kidding me? It’s 2017. When will this change?”

Hopefully tweets like Raisman’s can at least begin to change this culture.

 

Tough is beautiful

Being feminine and being tough are not mutually exclusive — that’s what wrestler Adeline Gray is trying to prove.

The three-time world champion wrestler is featured in ESPN magazine’s July 8 Body Issue, according to the Huffington Post, and in addition to talking about wrestling and her forthcoming appearance at the Rio Olympics, Gray also discussed some of the criticism she has faced as a female wrestler.

“Women’s wrestling is a great sport that a lot of people don’t know about. I still get that sideways tilt of the head, like a puppy is looking at me: ‘Women wrestle?'” Gray told ESPN, according to the Huffington Post. “It’s almost disheartening, because I work very hard and it’s a very competitive field internationally, and people in our country just don’t really know about it.”

Gray also mentioned that the public has a generalized — often stereotypical — image of a female wrestler as someone that is “obese and going out there on the mat to try to smash people’s heads.” But, the Huffington Post says the 25-year-old offered that wrestling does not even come close to some people’s misconceptions.

” It’s skill, strength, power and executing that in a very precise way,” she said.

But these aren’t the only harsh judgments that Gray has had to combat. She’s even had to tackle an inherent sexism that touches all female wrestlers, says the Huffington Post. She told ESPN:

“I absolutely hate the statement, ‘You’re too pretty to wrestle’ … I think people used to view female athletes as very butch, masculine — you kind of had to disregard your femininity to excel at an elite sport. Now it’s just a different world … You are allowed to be a female and be considered beautiful and still be an athlete and still be badass in that realm.”

Despite attempts to be boxed in by gender norms, the Huffington Post says Gray told ESPN that she hopes she can inspire young girls who want to pursue wrestling. The Huffington Post says she explained her desire this way:

“I want to impart some dreams to young girls who haven’t had opportunities in the past. Boys really have a leg up on us because they have these professional leagues that they can dream about … So if I can be like Serena Williams or like some of these main stars out there who are being iconic and groundbreaking and are role models for this next generation, it would be an honor and a blessing.”