Beyoncé takes over September issue of ‘Vogue’

Queen Bey has extended her reign to the cover of Vogue.

According to HuffPost, Beyoncé has been given ” unprecedented control over the cover of the upcoming September issue, sources say, and the music icon hired the first black photographer to shoot a cover in the publication’s 126-year history. ”

With Anna Wintour giving the multi-hyphenate full control over not only the cover, but also the photos on the inside of her and their captions — something HuffPost says the publication is “contractually obligated” to do — the move is unprecedented in terms of the breadth and depth of the control relinquished.

HuffPost says a source reports that typically, “cover subjects are usually given little to no say in their photos and are sent the cover in the week ahead of publication.” Beyoncé, however, has had control of much of the process, says HuffPost, right down to writing photo captions, which are in “long-form” — and of course, selecting her own photographer.

Tasked with snapping the perfect shot of the singer is 23-year-old Tyler Mitchell, who HuffPost says has already made a name for himself by photographing fashion campaigns for Marc Jacobs and Givenchy.

While sources speculate that Mitchell was chosen as a direct result of Beyoncé’s “power and influence,” HuffPosts says the quality of Mitchell’s work may speak for itself.

“I depict black people and people of color in a really real and pure way,” he told The New York Times in December. “There is an honest gaze to my photos.”

No matter the reason for his selection, we’re sure of one thing: this cover is going to be loved lights out.

 

 

 

Turner transforms negative perceptions into body-positive pride

When model Sophie Turner saw behind-the-scenes photos of herself from a photoshoot, the first thing she noticed was her cellulite.

“I felt disgusting,” she told People magazine. But the 22-year-old decided that her cellulite — something she had since age 12 — would no longer hold such power in her life.

“It’s something I’ve grown up with, so I thought, why should I be ashamed of it when over 90 percent of women have it?” she explained to People. “Why shouldn’t we embrace it?”

And embrace it she did. According to People, Turner decided to post the photo on Instagram in an attempt to help other women see the beauty in their own bodies. And after receiving almost 16,000 likes on the photo, it seems like she accomplished her mission.

“It’s so amazing knowing I’ve helped other women, and it makes me so happy having women who support me and want to love themselves more,” she said. “I think it’s important to love yourself.”

Amen to that, Sophie.

Girlgaze announces film contest

Glamour magazine and the Girlgaze project — a project that supports female-identifying filmmakers and photographers — are teaming up to offer young visual artists a chance to practice their craft on a major stage.

Launching the #NewView film competition, directors are asked to “create an original short film (3-5 minutes) that showcases their point of view — on an issue, on their own life or on our culture,” according to the contest site.

While the contest seeks to understand how young women view the world, it also aims to close the divide between the number of men and women who direct films. According to the #NewView site, “just 11 percent of all directors on the 500 top-grossing domestic films are women. That number is only slightly higher — 32 percent — on short films.”

Judging the competition are a host of celebrity panelists, ranging from Scandal creator Shonda Rhimes, to actress and activist Amandla Stenberg, to Glamour editor-in-chief Cindi Leive. Five winners will receive $3,000 and the potential to be featured in Glamour, as well as “production budgets to create a film for Glamour or one of our brand partners including Birchbox, LuMee, THE OUTNET.COM, and South Coast Plaza.”

To enter, visit the contest site — and be sure to get a move on your film, because entries are due June 30.

(Disclaimer: THL founder Nicole Funaro is a Girlgaze Project ambassador).

‘Glamour’ goes all-female for February issue

When a magazine designed for women has most of their creative content done by men, there is a problem. That’s why Glamours latest issue features photography, styling, hair and makeup done solely by women.

On on Jan. 3 , Glamour Editor in Chief Cindi Leive published an article on the magazine’s website detailing the percentages of women contributing to the visual elements of the magazine that motivated the change.

“Only 37 percent of the photographers we were using in our own print pages were female, and 32 percent of the hairstylists. (Forty-nine percent of makeup artists were female, but dismayingly the ratio got lower as the story got bigger.)” she wrote.

Sharing that Glamour isn’t the only magazine with the issue, Leive said that she knew it was time to make a change and move toward gender parity. Beginning with their February issue, Leive wrote, “from first page to last, every photo we commissioned was created by a woman: photographers, stylists, hair, makeup, everything.”

Additionally, the magazine will make a concerted effort to increase the number of women in “creative-contributor roles” throughout the year, marking a New Year’s resolution of sorts for the glossy.

Leive closed her announcement of Glamour’s latest endeavor by pointing out that both men and women offer equally valuable contributions, ones that can only be recognized when they are given a chance to shine.

“Women and men alike can be adventurous, experimental, relatable, accessible, or wildly artistic, and our vision of fashion and beauty and life will be richer when all our voices are heard. I can’t wait for Glamour to be part of that.”

Kudos to you, Glamour.