Target unveils new swim styles, unretouched models

Target has just unveiled their brand-new 2018 swimwear collection, and it’s the perfect boost we need to get us through this chilly late-winter temperatures.

According to Bustle, the superstore just unveiled “1,700 different styles, colors and cuts” of new swimsuit styles that are made for all bodies. Target makes this apparent in the new line’s campaign, says Bustle, which features “zero retouching, reshaping, or extreme airbrushing.”

In announcing the move to make the ads as honest as possible, Target said in the line’s announcement that their goal is to make the swimsuit shopping experience as stress-free as possible:

“To show off the new styles you’ll see bright, vibrant images throughout our marketing campaign—all meant to inspire guests to have fun while rocking their favorite swimsuit. Something you won’t see? Reshaping or airbrushing. Building on the strong foundation we set with last year’s campaign, we’re celebrating women and encouraging them to embrace the beauty of their own bodies.”

Inspired by the beaches Saint Tropez, Brazil and Australia, Bustle says the line is broken down int five categories: Modern Minimalist, Boho, Heartbreaker, Americana and Tropical, all featuring bold colors, vibrant prints and trendy cuts (think monokinis, cutouts and high waists!) that will make your summer 2018 the most stylish one yet. Target’s website described each swimwear category — which comes in an extended size range — this way:

“Modern Minimalist highlights a sleek, contemporary vibe that sticks to solid colors and unfussy prints. Boho combines feminine details, like lace and crochet, with ’70s-inspired prints. Heartbreaker, our selection of lingerie-inspired swimwear, includes mesh detailing, lace, ruffles, embroidery and more. Americana focuses on solids, texture, color-blocking and—of course!—classic stars and stripes. Finally, our Tropical trend plays up bright colors, exotic prints and bold graphics.”

So how much does all of this wonderful costs? Bustle says pieces from the line range from $14.99 to $49.99, though most come in under $24.99.

Mendes & Reinhart reveal photos were edited for magazine

Two Riverdale actors were not about to let their photoshopped magazine covers go unnoticed, so they called out the publication in the most public way possible — on social media.

According to Elite Daily, Camila Mendes and Lili Reinhart both were photographed for Cosmopolitan Philippines, though their cover photos looked a bit different than they remembered: instead of showing their real figures, the images were instead shaven down in Photoshop, showing the actors as impossibly narrower than they are. So to bring attention to the unwarranted editing, the duo decided to point out the adjustments on Instagram.

“@lilireinhart and I feel disrespected & disturbed by the sight of our photoshopped bodies,” Mendes wrote via her Instagram Story, according to Elite Daily. “We want [Cosmopolitan Philippines] readers to know that those bodies are not ours.”

Both Mendes and Reinhart proceeded to post a sequence of their original images followed by the edited photos in their Instagram stories, says Elite Daily, highlighting the area of their torsos that were trimmed with a photo editing tool. Beyond this, Mendes also offered a written response on her Instagram story, writing that she and her Riverdale counterpart feel disrespected by the changes made to their photos.

Calling their figures “distorted,” Elite Daily says Mendes wrote that she and Reinhart “prefer to see our bodies the way they actually are. I’m not interested in having a slimmer waist, I’m more than satisfied with the one that I already have.”

Tell ’em, Camila!

See the images in question here.

Raisman, Shahidi star in new Aerie campaign

The AerieREAL campaign just got a brand-new crop of role models.

According to InStyle, the body-positive intimates line recruited U.S. Olympic gold medal gymnast Aly Raisman, actor Yara Shahidi and singer Rachel Platten to join their AerieREAL campaign as Role Models, starring alongside brand ambassador and model Iskra Lawrence. Debuting the latest installment of the campaign last week, InStyle says while the ad features the group totally unretouched in the brand’s signature underwear, this isn’t the only way they will be representing Aerie and it’s mission.

In fact, “the AerieREAL Role Models will host speaking engagements in stores, and design exclusive products with 100 percent of sales going to the charities of their choice,” reports InStyle. Jennifer Foyle, Aerie global brand president, certainly thinks that the group of models will have no problem creating change and inspiring others, saying in a statement they “embody AerieREAL and what it means to be strong, confident, and happy in your own skin.”

Proving Foyle right already in their initial statements for the brand, each Role Model shared what they hope to impart to women and girls in their time with the campaign.

“We’ve all been through something that, in the end, will make you a stronger person,” Raisman offered, while Platten said that “In being more vulnerable and having the courage to share my truths even more, I’ve learned that more people feel like that gives them permission to do the same.”

Watch Raisman, Shahidi, Platten and Lawrence inspire together in their campaign video for Aerie here.

 

CVS to stop editing beauty ads

CVS Pharmacy wants us to look good and feel good naturally — that is, without the help of digital photo editing tools.

According to Glamour, the chain pharmacy recently announced new standards for altering the beauty imagery used online, in ads and in stores. In union with this effort comes their brand-new CVS Beauty Mark, says Glamour, a “atermark that will indicate images that haven’t been digitally altered, which it’s defining as ‘changing or enhancing a person’s shape, size, proportion, skin or eye color, wrinkles or any other individual characteristics.'”

President of CVS Pharmacy and Executive Vice President of CVS Health Helena Foulkes called the new standards and watermark a response to recognizing the responsibility that comes with being a public-facing brand — and an influential one, at that.

“The connection between the propagation of unrealistic body images and negative health effects, especially in girls and young women, has been established,” she said. “As a purpose-led company, we strive to do our best to assure all of the messages we are sending to our customers reflect our purpose of helping people on their path to better health.”

While the Beauty Mark will only appear on CVS-produced images, Glamour reports that the pharmacy is working with drugstore beauty brands to develop industry-wide retouching guidelines and transparency standards, with the goal of having other brands’ ads on board by 2020.

 

Nyong’o responds to edited magazine cover

Lupita Nyong’o didn’t hold back her disappointment after her newly-released magazine cover revealed a heavily-edited photo of the actress.

According to Glamour, the actor took to Twitter to express her frustration at Grazia UK magazine, which edited her hair on its Novemeber 2017 cover and “completely erased the portion of her natural curls that was pulled back to give the impression of a close-cropped hairstyle.” To highlight the drastic editing, Glamour says that Nyong’o shared the original and edited images in her tweet, showing how the magazine gave her a buzzcut instead of showing her natural hair that was pulled into a low ponytail.

But her effort to shed light on the issue didn’t end there; Glamour reports that she also wrote an extensive Instagram post, writing that the images of beauty that filled her childhood were ones of “light skin” and “silky hair.” However, she wrote being on a magazine’s cover allows her to break those institutionalized standards of beauty for future generations, thus even more of a reason why the editing is disappointing:

“Being featured on the cover of a magazine fulfills me as it is an opportunity to show other dark, kinky-haired people, and particularly our children, that they are beautiful just the way they are. I am disappointed that @graziauk invited me to be on their cover and then edited out and smoothed my hair to fit their notion of what beautiful hair looks like.”

While the magazine has since apologized for the photo’s editing, Glamour points out that the issue highlights the “need more women of color involved in creating the images we see in media.”

Missguided ditches Photoshop in new apparel photos

Nobody — and no body — is perfect. And thanks to a diminished reliance on photo editing, we are now starting to see that in the fashion and retail industries.

Take Missguided, for example. According to PopSugarthe British retailer is now featuring models with visible stretch marks in their photos. Posting two photos to Instagram of a model showing off their velvet lingerie set, PopSugar says the photo ditches Photoshop to highlight the natural markings on the model’s body.

While not all of their photos have been swapped for unretouched images, PopSugar reports “there are now a handful more in swimsuits and dresses that show off marks on their chests, legs, and backs.”

The move was largely lauded on social media, with one user telling other brands to “take note” of their effort, says PopSugar, because “our perfect ‘imperfections’ don’t need to be scrubbed out.”

Amen to that!

Fonda featured on unretouched magazine cover

Beauty knows no age, and Jane Fonda’s recent magazine cover is no exception.

According to HuffPost, the Grace and Frankie star is featured on the cover of Town & Country magazine in what People reports is an unretouched photo showing Fonda in a button-down shirt and a chain-link necklace.

HuffPost says that the cover ” is the latest step in the beauty industry’s growing appreciation of older women,” which follows an Allure magazine cover featuring Helen Mirren that also announced a ban on the words “anti-aging” on their front cover.

“Whether we know it or not, [the term is] subtly reinforcing the message that aging is a condition we need to battle,” wrote Editor-in-Chief Michelle Lee, according to HuffPost. “Repeat after me: Growing older is a wonderful thing because it means that we get a chance, every day, to live a full, happy life.”

With Hollywood’s leading ladies showing us just how to own the skin we’re in, maybe the beauty and fashion industries will catch up and continue to highlight beauty at every age.

Getty Images implements new ban on retouched photos

Getty images is taking steps to ensure that models are accurately portrayed in photos.

According to HuffPost, the stock photo service emailed its contributors last week to inform them that, as of Oct. 1, Getty will require that “you do not submit to us any creative content depicting models whose body shapes have been retouched to make them look thinner or larger.”

HuffPost reports that the move follows a recent French law mandating that any image that feature digitally-altered models be tagged with the phrase “photographie retouchée,” or “retouched photo.” In a statement, Getty said that a major impetus behind the move was the realization that images can break stereotypes and increase tolerance and empowerment.

“…At a time when imagery is the most widely spoken global language, it has never been more important to produce and promote a visual language that is progressive and inclusive,” Getty said.

While the move is certainly a step in the right direction, HuffPost notes that the photo agency still allows photos with other altered features, such as “hair color, nose shape, skin and blemishes.”

 

Unretouched models abound in new Asos swimwear photos

If you’re worried about showing some skin at the beach this Fourth of July, Asos is here to tell you to celebrate your imperfections.

In fact, that’s exactly what models in their swimwear photos did. According to InStyle the retailer featured “models with stretch marks, acne scars, and birthmarks on their website,” refusing to edit their photos to make them blemish-free.

With the photos showcasing each model’s natural beauty, InStyle says Twitter was abuzz over the photos, with many tweeting their praise of the company.

Twitter user @Kelly_Horrigan showed her support by sharing, “round of applause to ASOS for not editing out their models stretch marks, finally realistic body images are being promoted, so beautiful 👏🏻💖.”

 

Patrick posts body-positive Instagram message

Instagram is filled with before-and-after style photos, but a recent trend on the app has been to share how different lighting and poses can affect the way one’s body is perceived. While the trend has largely been fueled by photos of models or fitness bloggers, race car driver Danica Patrick couldn’t help but join in.

According to Today, Patrick took to Instagram to post her own side-by-side photo in which the only thing different was the way she was posing. While the photo illustrates that something as subtle as a pose can make a difference in the way our bodies look, Patrick’s caption shed more light on the issue.

“We all want to look our best at all times, no shame in that,” she wrote, according to Today. “But don’t let someone else’s body put yours down. Use it for motivation.”

Concluding her post with one last inspirational message, Today says the famed driver told her followers to always respect their bodies.

“We all know when we are treating our bodies with the respect it deserves. It’s the one and only thing we own for life.”