Clinton makes cameo on ‘Madam Secretary’

Art and reality are merging for an all-new episode of CBS’ hit show, “Madam Secretary.”

According to Huffington Post, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic nominee for president Hillary Clinton will take to the small screen for an episode of the show alongside other former secretaries of state, including Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell.

The episode the trio will star in will air on Oct. 7, says HuffPost, the show’s fifth season premiere, with fictional “Secretary of State Elizabeth McCord (played by Téa Leoni) ask[ing] the three former secretaries of state for their advice on how to handle a fragile situation.”

As for the impact the three will make on the show, Executive Producer Lori McCreary said in a release that their presence is profound.

“Having three powerhouses of diplomacy agree to come on our show is awe-inspiring and humbling.”

Stila lipstick selling out for best reason

Who knew lipstick could be so empowering? Apparently Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez.

According to PopSugar, when the 28-year-old candidate from New York’s 14th Congressional District defeated “10-term incumbent” Representative Joseph Crowley in a stunning primary victory, she did so while wearing a bright red shade of lipstick — one that caught the eye of Twitter users, who began inquiring after the happy hue.

While Ocasio-Cortez told her followers in a response tweet that the exact lipstick was Stila’s “Stay All Day” liquid lipstick in the shade “Beso,” PopSugar says the decision wear red carried more significance than readily noticeable.

“…Suffragettes in the early 1900s wore the hue while protesting for women’s right to vote,” reports PopSugar, while “in 1912, the real-life Elizabeth Arden even handed out a similar lipstick to NYC marchers as a token of unity.”

And since Ocasio-Cortez revealed her lipstick shade, PopSugar says not only has Sephora sold out of the hue, her Twitter followers shared their support by sending their photos of their own Stila lip slicks.

History-infused or not, this show of women supporting women is encouraging — and, as PopSugar points out, don’t forget to focus on what really matters: what Ocasio-Cortez’s platform is: she “supports Medicare for all, abolishing ICE, expanding LGBTQ+ rights, and creating an assault weapons ban.”

 

 

San Francisco elects first black female mayor

All it takes is one woman to bust down the door for others to follow in her footsteps, and in San Francisco, London Breed did just that.

According to CNN, the 43-year-old politician has become the first African American woman to be elected as the mayor of San Francisco, earning the new position after her opponent conceded what was a tight mayoral race.

In a news conference, CNN says Breed not only thanked her supporters, she expressed her hope for the city’s future.

“I am so hopeful about the future of our city, and I am looking forward to serving as your mayor,” she said. “I am truly humbled and I am truly honored.”

But beyond sharing her optimistic outlook for what lay ahead for San Francisco, she also made sure to note that she will not bring just her followers into the city’s future; instead, CNN reports that Breed extended her advocacy to those who didn’t support or vote for her.

“Whether you voted for me or not, as mayor, I will be your mayor too,” she offered.

CNN says Breed will be the city’s mayor until 2020, as she is “finishing the term of the late Mayor Ed Lee, who died in December at age 65.”

Senate approves resolution allowing Duckworth to bring newborn on floor

After becoming the first senator to give birth while in office, Tammy Duckworth faces what millions of women around the world face: how to balance caring for their family while also thriving in their career. But a new Senate resolution just made it a whole lot easier for this new mom and democratic senator from Illinois.

According to The Hill, the Senate has approved a resolution to allow Sen. Duckworth to bring her baby on the floor, opening the door for any senator to “bring a child younger than one year of age onto the floor during votes.”

Because senators have to be physically present in the Senate chamber in order to vote, The Hill said Duckworth filed the resolution shortly after giving birth to her baby girl, and senators Amy Klombuchar (D-Minn.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) quickly moved it out of committee. The resolution was eventually passed with unanimous consent.

“We are proud to have Senator Tammy Duckworth — working mom to a newborn —among our ranks and I’m glad the Rules Committee was able to swiftly make this historic rule change for her and future senators,” Klobuchar said in a statement, according to The Hill, with Blunt adding that “being a parent is a difficult job, and the Senate rules shouldn’t make it any harder.”

For Duckworth, the move may have larger implications beyond the Senate floor.

“The Senate is leading by example and sending the important message that working parents everywhere deserve family-friendly workplace policies,” she said in a statement. “These policies aren’t just a women’s issue, they are a common-sense economic issue.”

While changes like these to workplaces around the U.S. may not be on the horizon just yet, this resolution may just open the door for changes that provide family-friendly workplaces for all.

Election Day brings increased representation

While Election Day 2017 was all about electing leaders in municipalities around the United States, it was also a time to usher in what may be a new era of increased representation in American politics.

According to The Hill, Andrea Jenkins — a city council candidate in Minneapolis — became “the first openly transgender woman of color elected to public office in the United States” when she won the vote on Nov. 7.

Jenkins, who ran as a Democrat, campaigned on hot-button issues such as affordable housing and raising the minimum wage, says The Hill, with the newly-elected council member previously serving as a policy aide to council Vice President Elizabeth Glidden.

But Jenkins wasn’t the only one to break down barriers this Election Day. CBS News reports that in Virginia, transgender woman Danica Roem “unseated one of Virginia’s longest serving and most socially conservative lawmakers,” making history as “the first openly transgender person elected and seated in a state legislature.”

The Democrat and former newspaper reporter not only made history, CBS News says Roem scored an additional victory on election night — defeating the candidate Del. Bob Marshall, who “sponsored a bill this year that would have restricted the bathrooms transgender people can use.”

With diversity in people, practice and though making their way into local governments everywhere, perhaps the theme of this year’s election is best summed up by Roem herself:

“No matter what you look like, where you come from, how you worship or who you love, if you have good public policy ideas, if you’re qualified for office, you have every right to bring your ideas to the table.”

 

Nicole’s Favorites: Digital Must-Reads

Friday is here, and with the weekend officially upon us, you might feel like relaxing before jumping into your weekend plans. Whether your agenda includes going out every night, sampling every brunch in a 30-mile radius or cozying up with a good book, it won’t hurt to celebrate the start of the weekend with a bit of inspiration from some of the most powerful women around.

So before diving into your busy — or lazy — weekend schedule, be sure to give these online reads a glance:

How Shania Twain Learned to Feel Beautiful After Tragedy and Self-Doubt” – Without a doubt one of my favorite artists of all time, Twain imparts her tale of self-doubt, tragedy and eventual acceptance and self-love to InStyle‘s Sarah Cristobal. From feeling anything but pretty as a child to learning how to feel comfortable in her own skin through the loss of her parents, a divorce and a vocal cord injury, Twain’s determination to overcome all that life has thrown at her is the definition of beauty and grace.

TIME magazine’s “Firsts” series – A series of video and print interviews with women who have been the first in their industry to achieve success, this project aims to inspire women and girls to “find someone whose presence in the highest reaches of success says to her that it is safe to climb, come on up, the view is spectacular.” With interviews ranging from Oprah Winfrey to Serena Williams, Barbara Walters to Selena Gomez, this series will not only make you believe in the power of women, but also in the power of your own abilities. Two of the most notable interviews come from Ava DuVernay, the first black to direct a film nominated for a Best Picture Oscar (Selma), and first female secretary of state Madeleine Albright; I would be lying if I said I didn’t cry watching them speak.

So wherever your weekend takes you, be sure to get a healthy dose of empowerment from some of the most inspirational women of our time.

XO,

Nicole

Obama offers insight on racism and sexism

While Michelle Obama may no longer be the First Lady of the United States, that doesn’t mean she can’t share her wisdom with us anymore.

According to Women in the World, Obama recently opened up about her encounters with racism and sexism before the Women’s Foundation of Colorado’s 30th anniversary celebration. Interviewed onstage by WFCO president and CEO Lauren Casteel, Women in the World says Casteel asked Obama “whether she had been hurt by any of the shards from the glass ceiling she smashed by becoming America’s first black first lady.”

Obama then shared that what hurt the most were those insults that were meant to have maximum impact, Women in the World reports, adding that it was only magnified by knowing that her hard work as First Lady was undercut by her skin color. However, Obama noted that the “cuts” she received by shattering that glass ceiling don’t hold her back — and women in general shouldn’t be deterred, either.

“Women, we endure those cuts in so many ways that we don’t even notice we’re cut,” she said. “We are living with small tiny cuts, and we are bleeding every single day. And we’re still getting up.”

May we continue to get up — always.

 

McSally tackles Capitol Hill dress code

Dressing professionally for the summer may have just become more difficult for those at work in the halls of Congress, but one U.S. representative is not about to sit idly by as dress code enforcements take a bit of a sexist turn.

According to Glamour, a recent CBS News report details a dress code specific to the House chambers and the Speaker’s Lobby, which includes wearing “appropriate business attire,” as Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin) put it. For women, Glamour says this means wearing “a sleeved dress or blouse and wear closed-toed shoes,” while men should dress in a suit jacket and tie.

While the dress code has been enforced among men and women, one reporter’s experience brought the dress code to the floor of the House for GOP Congresswoman Martha McSally. When Haley Byrd, a congressional reporter for Independent Journal Review, was walking through the Speaker’s Lobby, Glamour says the young journalist was tossed out of the area for wearing a sleeveless dress, an incident that occurred after being offered a sweater to cover up.

Even though Byrd’s incident took place in May, McSally took a moment this week to address the issue and point out the latent sexism of the dress code policy.

“Before I yield back, I want to point out, I’m standing here in my professional attire, which happens to be a sleeveless dress and open-toed shoes,’ she said, according to Glamour. ‘With that, Mr. Speaker, I yield back.”