Nyong’o responds to edited magazine cover

Lupita Nyong’o didn’t hold back her disappointment after her newly-released magazine cover revealed a heavily-edited photo of the actress.

According to Glamour, the actor took to Twitter to express her frustration at Grazia UK magazine, which edited her hair on its Novemeber 2017 cover and “completely erased the portion of her natural curls that was pulled back to give the impression of a close-cropped hairstyle.” To highlight the drastic editing, Glamour says that Nyong’o shared the original and edited images in her tweet, showing how the magazine gave her a buzzcut instead of showing her natural hair that was pulled into a low ponytail.

But her effort to shed light on the issue didn’t end there; Glamour reports that she also wrote an extensive Instagram post, writing that the images of beauty that filled her childhood were ones of “light skin” and “silky hair.” However, she wrote being on a magazine’s cover allows her to break those institutionalized standards of beauty for future generations, thus even more of a reason why the editing is disappointing:

“Being featured on the cover of a magazine fulfills me as it is an opportunity to show other dark, kinky-haired people, and particularly our children, that they are beautiful just the way they are. I am disappointed that @graziauk invited me to be on their cover and then edited out and smoothed my hair to fit their notion of what beautiful hair looks like.”

While the magazine has since apologized for the photo’s editing, Glamour points out that the issue highlights the “need more women of color involved in creating the images we see in media.”

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Nicole’s Favorites: Digital Must-Reads

Sometimes, speaking up or putting yourself out there can be extremely difficult. It can take all the confidence and bravery you can muster to finally speak your mind, stand up for yourself or go out on a limb in pursuit of your dreams. But, when you have models of those who have gone before us — those who have busted down doors or pointed out double standards — it can make it a little bit easier for the rest of us who are trying to find our way.

This week, I’ve chosen two pieces that I think are very important to read, albeit for different reasons. One teaches us to speak up in the midst of the most difficult or trying circumstances, while the other offers insight on the roadblocks women may face when striving for success. Both, however, will leave you feeling stronger and inspired. Here are my two favorite online reads for this week:

Gretchen Carlson: What Speaking Up Against Sexual Harassment Did for Me—and Why I Encourage Other Women to Do the Same 

(Trigger warning) The former Fox News host reveals details the sexual assaults she faced as a Miss America candidate and later sexual harassment she faced working her way up the media industry. Her experiences — and the countless others she heard from women with similar stories — then inspired her to write Be FierceStop Harassment and Take Back Your Power, due out on Oct. 17. Read her essay on InStyle here.

Jewel Eliese: How to Get Published: Be Male?

Writer Jewel Eliese breaks down the barriers to success in the world of publishing, which she concludes may be a function of gender, as males — and even females writing under male pseudonyms — have an easier time getting manuscript requests and even published. However, Eliese argues that we, as a society, can change things if we remove gender and its adjoining stereotypes from the equation and focus on the quality of the storytelling, not the name signed at the bottom of a query letter. Read her full article here.

While these pieces certainly point out the many trappings that can go along with gender, they should serve as a source of inspiration, letting us all know that change is possible if we have the courage to pursue it.

XO,

Nicole

Leive leaves ‘Glamour’ as EIC

Earlier this week, Robbie Myers vacated ELLE‘s editor-in-chief position, and Nina García stepped up to fill the role. Now, yet another glossy is left without a captain at the helm of the masthead.

According to Fashionista, Cindi Leive announced on Thursday, Sept. 14 that she is also stepping down from her post as EIC at Glamour, a position she held for 16 years. Leive announced the decision to depart the magazine in an exclusive interview with The New York Times, says Fashionista, though she did not offer any hints on what her next move might be.

While Myers and Leive their posts at their respective magazines this week, Fashionista reports that Leive was only one of four EICs to resign this week, following Graydon Carter of Vanity Fair and Nancy Gibbs of TIME.

Wishing Leive the best of luck in whatever she does next. To read her entire interview, click here.

Marie Claire publishes first sustainability issue

With 33 percent of consumers seeking out environmentally and socially friendly brands, sustainability is becoming an increasingly high priority for consumers around the world.  But sometimes, shoppers need a little help finding inspiration for their sustainable style pursuits.

Cue Marie Claire, who according to Fashionista just released their first-ever “sustainability-focused” issue, which not only “features stories on eco-friendly fashion faves like Reformation,” but also “profiles eco-fashion activists like Emma Watson and Livia Firth.”

In an interview with FashionistaMarie Claire editor-in-chief Anne Fulenwider shared that the idea for the issue was initiated by her editors at a staff dinner over a year earlier, and finally came to fruition with the help of an advisory board filled with fashion and sustainability experts alike, which included the likes of worldwide sustainability director for Amazon Kara Hurst and representatives from the CFDA.

When asked by Fashionista about the “relentless positivity” of fashion magazines in a time when politics have made a lack of concern about the environment apparent, Fulenwider said she hopes Marie Claire‘s attention to sustainability will have something of a ripple effect.

“I think one of the best things we can do is apply peer pressure,” she told Fashionista. “It’s like the high school rule. If enough cool people are taking this on, those who may not be moved by their own moral compass may change, too.”

Here’s hoping fashion media can incite change! To read about sustainability in Marie Claire, click here.

‘Goop’ to go to print with Condé Nast

For a digital platform to take on a print form in our web-based era is almost unheard of, but Goop is set to go to print, thanks to a new partnership with Condé Nast.

According to Variety, Gwyneth Paltrow’s ” female-focused digital lifestyle brand” has “teamed up with Condé Nast in a partnership anchored around a print magazine that will encompass content on digital and social media.”

The magazine will be released quarterly starting in September, reports WWD, and will feature both print content from Goop as well as creative and design input from Condé Nast. Centering on themes of health and wellness, WWD says that the concept for a print-version of Goop came to life following a conversation between Paltrow (Goop’s founder and CEO) and Editor in Chief of Vogue and Condé Nast artistic director Anna Wintour.

Variety says the quarterly glossies will be branded as “premium, collectible editions.”

Oprah’s publishing imprint launches in January 2017

If you’ve been longing for some interesting books, there may soon be a host of titles coming your way.

According to The Cut, everyone’s favorite former-talk-show-host-turned-network-executive Oprah Winfrey will be launching her very own publishing imprint in January 2017. Winfrey’s “Oprah Books” will debut in the new year, says The Cut, and it already has some interesting reads waiting to be released.

“An Oprah Book’s first release will be Winfrey’s very own cookbook, Food, Health and Happiness, on January 3,” reports The Cut, “with Maria Smilios’s The Black Angels: The Untold Story of the Nurses Who Helped Cure Tuberculosis to follow in 2018.”

Oprah’s memoir, The Life You Want, was supposed to make its debut in the coming year under Flatiron Books (a division of Macmillan), according to The Cut, however, no release date has been announced.