Mendes & Reinhart reveal photos were edited for magazine

Two Riverdale actors were not about to let their photoshopped magazine covers go unnoticed, so they called out the publication in the most public way possible — on social media.

According to Elite Daily, Camila Mendes and Lili Reinhart both were photographed for Cosmopolitan Philippines, though their cover photos looked a bit different than they remembered: instead of showing their real figures, the images were instead shaven down in Photoshop, showing the actors as impossibly narrower than they are. So to bring attention to the unwarranted editing, the duo decided to point out the adjustments on Instagram.

“@lilireinhart and I feel disrespected & disturbed by the sight of our photoshopped bodies,” Mendes wrote via her Instagram Story, according to Elite Daily. “We want [Cosmopolitan Philippines] readers to know that those bodies are not ours.”

Both Mendes and Reinhart proceeded to post a sequence of their original images followed by the edited photos in their Instagram stories, says Elite Daily, highlighting the area of their torsos that were trimmed with a photo editing tool. Beyond this, Mendes also offered a written response on her Instagram story, writing that she and her Riverdale counterpart feel disrespected by the changes made to their photos.

Calling their figures “distorted,” Elite Daily says Mendes wrote that she and Reinhart “prefer to see our bodies the way they actually are. I’m not interested in having a slimmer waist, I’m more than satisfied with the one that I already have.”

Tell ’em, Camila!

See the images in question here.

Getty Images implements new ban on retouched photos

Getty images is taking steps to ensure that models are accurately portrayed in photos.

According to HuffPost, the stock photo service emailed its contributors last week to inform them that, as of Oct. 1, Getty will require that “you do not submit to us any creative content depicting models whose body shapes have been retouched to make them look thinner or larger.”

HuffPost reports that the move follows a recent French law mandating that any image that feature digitally-altered models be tagged with the phrase “photographie retouchée,” or “retouched photo.” In a statement, Getty said that a major impetus behind the move was the realization that images can break stereotypes and increase tolerance and empowerment.

“…At a time when imagery is the most widely spoken global language, it has never been more important to produce and promote a visual language that is progressive and inclusive,” Getty said.

While the move is certainly a step in the right direction, HuffPost notes that the photo agency still allows photos with other altered features, such as “hair color, nose shape, skin and blemishes.”

 

Lawrence illuminates the illusions of retouched photos

Retouching photos sounds harmless, but when it completely alters one’s appearance, it can be damaging — just as Iskra Lawrence.

According to HuffPost, the Aerie model recently took to Instagram to share a side-by-side photo of herself; wearing nothing but lingerie, Lawrence not only looks flawless, she also doesn’t even look like herself. Although HuffPost says Lawrence noted she was a few sizes smaller in the photos anyway, the point still remains: Photoshop can produce completely unrealistic results.

“That smooth a$$ skin? Not mine ― a computer programme did that. The full thick hair ― extensions,” she wrote, according to HuffPost. “…Waist + legs + arms slimmed with a photoshop tool. No eye bags, well actually no nothing that makes me resemble the real me. And the WORST thing about it… I WANTED TO LOOK LIKE THIS!!!”

Sharing that at the time, she thought that “I had ‘perfected’ images (like the ones I saw of other models) that I would book more jobs” and thus she would be “happy and successful,” HuffPost says Lawrence revealed that the images were ultimately damaging to her psyche.

“In reality seeing retouched images of myself gave me even more insecurities and body image issues because I couldn’t even look like or relate to the image of myself!” she wrote.

So what did the body positivity advocate learn?

“What’s real is YOU, your imperfectly perfect self that’s what makes you magical, unique and beautiful.”

Amen to that.