Douglas becomes a ‘shero’

Gabby Douglas has made two Olympic appearances, won several gold medals and sits atop the world of gymnastics as one of the most celebrated athletes to come out of the sport. But of all of these accomplishments comes one that is all about inspiring young children to follow in her footsteps.

According to HuffPost, Douglas has officially joined Barbie’s “Shero” line with a doll of her own. The line, which “features other badass women like director Ava DuVernay, actress Emmy Rossum and ballerina Misty Copeland,” aims to depict different kinds of female heroes, says HuffPost.

Accompanying her doll is a description of why Douglas was chosen for the line, citing her “confidence, work ethic and belief in herself” as reasons why she is “an extraordinary role model to girls.”

“The Gabby Douglas Barbie® doll celebrates the extraordinary accomplishments of this inspiring athlete and earns her role as a Barbie® ‘Shero’ honoree, a female hero inspiring girls by breaking boundaries and expanding possibilities for women everywhere.”

For Douglas, the doll is not only inspiring young boys and girls to pursue their dreams, it’s also about quashing limitations placed on us by society based on how we look.

“It’s so important in the African American community to have that doll that looks like you,” she told HuffPost. “For me that’s really big because it sends a positive message saying, you know what you can go out there and achieve your goals no matter what your hair looks like, no matter what color your skin is.”

The doll, which is currently on sale, retails for $24.95.

 

 

Winter learns body acceptance from ‘Modern Family’ co-star

It takes a wise, knowledgable teacher to impart a valuable lesson to their student. And that’s exactly what Sofia Vergara became to Ariel Winter when Winter struggled to accept her body.

According to Motto by TIME, the 18-year-old Modern Family actress told Self.com that Vergara was a role model of sorts to her after struggling with her developing body.

“She could see that I was struggling a little bit with how to deal with my body, and was always trying to give me advice, like, ‘Here are some brands that would look good on our body type,’ or ‘Wear whatever you want, and feel good about yourself,'” Winter said of Vergara.

Adding to her difficulties adjusting were social media naysayers, says Motto, which Winter said was not only “the worst” for her self-esteem, but also a constant struggle to not succumb to the online negativity.

“It was hard for me in the beginning to deal with people’s comments and deal with everybody having an opinion on absolutely everything I did,” she said, according to Motto. “It was hard for me to not fall prey to wanting to change the way I felt and the way I did things and the way I looked because of what other people said.”

However, with the help of her older sister, Shanelle Workman, and Vergara, Motto says she was able to combat the criticism, learning that it’s only her happiness that matters most:

“But as I got older, I started to realize that as long as I’m positive in my life and as long as I feel good about my decisions and stick to how I feel and the things I want to do, that’s what’s most important,” Winter shared. “And that’s what’s going to get me through in life.”