Time’s Up hit major milestones in first month

The Time’s Up campaign has achieved quite a bit in its first month in action: from a wide-reaching social media movement to a “black-out” at the Golden Globes to a white-rose moment at the Grammys, Time’s Up is certainly making its presence known in all aspects of pop culture. But now, the movement has reached an important set of milestones in its first month — milestones that will help further its mission in the future.

According to Glamour, at a recent Time’s Up panel in Los Angeles, “Obama administration alum and lawyer Tina Tchen announced that the group had already raised $20 million, from about 20,000 donors across the country.” Additionally, Tchen announced that the campaign has also received 1,000 requests for help, says ELLE, with requests coming from people of all walks of life.

“The need is clearly there, from all industries—farm workers, hotel workers, steel workers,” Tchen said at the panel. “I had a steel worker from Indiana reach out to my office….Time’s Up has spoken to men and women who need help getting safety and equity in the workplace.”

In terms of getting that help to those who need it, Glamour reports that lawyer and one of the founder of the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund Roberta Kaplan said the requests are siphoned through the National Women’s Law Center:

“They have a number of lawyers who volunteer to work on these cases,” she said, “And they’re matching up clients with potential lawyers. Obviously the clients have to decide for themselves whether they want Lawyer A or Lawyer B to represent them.” The calls for help keeping coming in, says Kaplan: “[We’re getting requests] from people similar to some of the ‘me too’ stuff in Hollywood that you’ve heard—maybe not so famous, but people who’ve had bad experiences with someone in the industry—to other industries. I just got an email this morning from a nurse in Louisiana.”

And that $20 million — Kaplan told Glamour that the sum is “not that much,” as it “won’t even meet the current demand” for help. But with the campaign in its infancy and a plan in place to leverage the public platform of Hollywood to gain more traction, the Time’s Up campaign is bound to keep growing.

Just take the Song Suffragettes, for example: formed in 2014 in response a concern that women were being excluded from record labels and radio stations, The Columbian reports that the group of Nashville-based female musicians crafted a song and music video about the movement, with earnings from the song being donated to the Legal Defense Fund.

And Times Up even found a home across the pond, with British natives of Hollywood’s elite — such as Keira Knightley, Emma Thompson and Daisy Ridley — are “in the process of forming their own version of the movement” in Britain, according to Variety, advocating for both equal pay and safer workplaces for women across all industries.

Looks like time has not run out for the Time’s Up movement — and it’s not running out any time soon.

To donate or request help, click here.

Jay-Z inspires in tour stops

Let’s face it: we could all use a little inspiration every now and then. And thanks to Jay-Z, we sure got a dose.

According to HuffPost, the famed rapper took a moment at his concert at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio to serve up some inspiration to a young fan attending his 4:44 Tour. Stopping his own show, Jay-Z offered that nothing can — or should — keep the unidentified 9-year-old girl from being anything she wants:

At this very moment, America is way more sexist than they are racist,” he said. “But you, young lady, you got the potential to be the next president of the United States. You believe that.”

Apparently this isn’t the first time Jay-Z has used his show to share a message of empowerment; HuffPost says he also said during his Nashville show that even though there’s “a lot going on in the world right now,” he knows that “love will always trump hate.”

Preach it, Jay.

LA Sparks channel Beyoncé in response to social media sexism

Women are capable of much more than just preparing snacks to watch a sporting event. So when one Twitter user decided to tell members of the 2016 WNBA Champion Los Angeles Sparks to get off the basketball court and go back into the kitchen, the team served up a slam-dunk response to shut down the social media sexism.

According to HuffPost, the team received several sexist tweets, one of which urged them to “go back to the kitchen bc this isn’t a sport and nobody cares” while another read, “Exterminate all women.” With such harsh words sent their way, HuffPost says the team responded with some inspiration from the queen of slayage herself: Beyoncé.

Creating their own music video of “Sorry,” the Sparks dressed to the nines — and showed off their championship rings — as the kiss-off anthem plays in the background and sexist tweets line the frame, all as they lip-sync the words, “I ain’t sorry.” While the full video was posted to Twitter, HuffPost says it was later removed.

Even though its time online was short-lived, you can watch a one-minute clip from the Sparks’ comeback video here.

Obama offers insight on racism and sexism

While Michelle Obama may no longer be the First Lady of the United States, that doesn’t mean she can’t share her wisdom with us anymore.

According to Women in the World, Obama recently opened up about her encounters with racism and sexism before the Women’s Foundation of Colorado’s 30th anniversary celebration. Interviewed onstage by WFCO president and CEO Lauren Casteel, Women in the World says Casteel asked Obama “whether she had been hurt by any of the shards from the glass ceiling she smashed by becoming America’s first black first lady.”

Obama then shared that what hurt the most were those insults that were meant to have maximum impact, Women in the World reports, adding that it was only magnified by knowing that her hard work as First Lady was undercut by her skin color. However, Obama noted that the “cuts” she received by shattering that glass ceiling don’t hold her back — and women in general shouldn’t be deterred, either.

“Women, we endure those cuts in so many ways that we don’t even notice we’re cut,” she said. “We are living with small tiny cuts, and we are bleeding every single day. And we’re still getting up.”

May we continue to get up — always.

 

Mom corrects daughter’s sexist homework

Sometimes, homework helps children learn the wrong things.

According to Glamour, children’s book editor Lynne Polvino found that to be true when she was helping her six-year-old daughter with her homework. Given a fill-in-the-blank worksheet that told the fictional story of a girl named Lisa, Glamour says the exercise told a tale of a young girl who was unhappy that her mother went back to work, while her “inept” father had to make her breakfast and forced her to wash dishes after.

Shocked at the messages the worksheet was sending to students, Glamour says Polvino “emailed her daughter’s teacher, and says the teacher replied that she agreed that the worksheet was outdated and would more carefully review future assignments.”

But her efforts didn’t end there: she decided to rewrite the worksheet, says Glamour, working in details that made the worksheet less misogynistic and more representative of working parents today. Not only is Lisa happier in Polvino’s story, her family also shares responsibilities, according to Glamour:

“Lisa’s mother receives parental leave because her workplace ‘valued her important contributions,’ and her father is now home on his leave and ‘contributing equally’ to the running of the household. Lisa’s dad makes breakfast easily, because testicles don’t get in the way of scrambling eggs. In what might be her best line, Lisa washes her dishes ‘because all functional humans should learn to clean up after themselves and help others.'”

Lisa even enjoys school in Polvino’s tale, Glamour reportsbecause she has “play-based learning” and “plays with Legos at a federally funded after school program.”

Let’s hope more worksheets like Polvino’s populate classrooms very soon.

See a side-by-side comparison of the worksheets here.

Lively takes down reporter

Not every red carpet is about fashion. In fact, most aren’t, as they should be a celebration of accomplishments and not looks — especially that of Variety magazine’s Powered by Women luncheon.

According to Glamour, Blake Lively — an honoree at this year’s event for her work to end child pornography — was met not with a question about her endeavors but about her fashion choices, and decided to let the reporter know how inappropriate the question was.

“Are we really doing this? Would you ask a man that?” Lively said, according to a video captured by USA Today’s Maeve McDermott, reports Glamour. “[I hope we] become more aware, and that we change, and that we build women up. So, you can ask me another question.”

Attending the luncheon for her work with Child Rescue Coalition, a group that seeks to not only “apprehend and convict abusers of children,” but to also rescue those affected and prevent future abuse, Glamour points out that the journalist’s questions on fashion were egregiously unmerited, especially within the context of Lively’s speech:

“The kids are getting younger and the content is getting more devastating,” she said, according to USA Today. “When a law enforcement officer told me this, I asked, ‘How young are the victims?’ And he told me infants—and I have a 6-month-old daughter.”

Here’s hoping future reporters can focus more on what others do instead of how they look.

Call the ‘Ghostbusters’ cast to fight sexism

When sexism is overshadowing your craft, who are you going to call to fix it? The cast of the Ghostbusters reboot, that’s who.

According to the Huffington Post, the film’s cast — which includes Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon — joined the New York Times‘ David Itzkoff and the film’s director Paul Feig to discuss the making of the film along with the sexist feedback they’ve received.

While many viewers are claiming that the revamp, which will be released on July 15,  will “ruin” the original, the Huffington Post says that the cast told Itzkoff that they have had it with other sexist comments they’ve fielded:

Jones: To me, the people who are crying about, “This is ruining my childhood,” this movie is not for them anyway.

Wiig: They need to probably go to therapy.

McCarthy: I think their childhood was pretty much ruined already. If this broke it, it was pretty fragile to begin with. It is good to remember, it is a tiny, tiny fraction that screams. Normal, healthy people don’t stand outside, saying, “You’re ruining my childhood!” There’s one nut on every corner in every city that does it. But so what? The other 300,000 people in a town aren’t doing that.

But their responses to the sexist retorts didn’t end there. The Huffington Post says that McCarthy told Itzkoff that she “heard more about the young girls who were excited about the film than the sexist backlash.”

“When we were shooting, Paul would bring in pictures of young girls dressing up, and they had made their own proton packs and jumpsuits, and I thought, that’s really cool,” she said, according to HuffPost. “I was more aware of that stuff.”

Jones agreed, saying that she was surprised by the Internet uproar over the all-female cast. But she also said that she doesn’t understand why such backlash even exists. HuffPost says the actress put it this way:

“It’s the same thing, when you go to a comedy club. [announcer’s voice] ‘Are you guys ready for a woman?’ Are you ready for a unicorn? Why is being a woman so surprising? There are two sexes. A man and a woman. So, if it’s not a man in a movie, what else was it going to be?”

But perhaps Jones expressed her surprise at the backlash best when she said it’s unfounded because “women have been killing it for years.”

And we’re pretty sure Jones and the rest of the cast will only carry on the tradition in this film.