Everlane launches sustainable silk

This new development in silk is as sustainably sourced as it is beautiful.

According to Fashionista, “direct-to-consumer basics brand” Everlane has just reinvented their line of silk with “clean silk,” making silk products that are environmentally friendly and sustainably sound.

The overhaul, says Fashionista, takes place in three parts: the first involves “using a factory that is LEED certified (meaning it’s more energy-efficient) and a dyehouse that is Bluesign-certified (meaning it’s proven to be free of a range of harmful substances).”

The second, which is set to take effect in 2020, reports Fashionista, will involve “working entirely with regenerative, organically farmed silk.” And by 2022, Fashionista says the company wants to have their silk “dyed and washed with 100 percent recycled water and renewable energy.”

Helping to make these changes possible is a collaboration with Nanchong Fashion Foundation Manufacturing Ltd. in China, says Fashionista, which constructed a new energy-efficient manufacturing, all while trying to develop an organic silk farm.

With these eco-friendly options on the horizon, Fashionista says that Everlane customers can expect greater transparency and more sustainably-sourced options in the near future, because, as Everlane head of product Kim Smith says, it is “top-of-mind now in everything we do.”

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Allbirds unveils sustainably-made flip-flops

These flip-flops are sandals you can feel good about splurging on.

Forbes says footwear brand Allbirds has launched a selection of flip-flops made from sustainable Brazilian sugar cane that aims to replace “plastic foam in traditional shoe soles, which is often made from dirty oil and is highly polluting.”

The launch of these sustainable soles follows a string of other notable releases, such as unveiling kids sizes called Smallbirds and making a line of “‘tree’ runners and loungers made from eucalyptus fiber,” Forbes says their latest launch allows customers to “purchase interchangeable straps at $15 for the Japanese-inspired flip flops, which are available in four summery colorways.” The sandals themselves cost a cool $35.

Only available for a limited time, Forbes says the technology used to created these flip-flops — called Sugar Zeffers — may have a bigger impact on footwear going forward, with the company planning to make the technology available to other shoe manufacturers.

“We know there’s interest within the industry, but what we’re hopeful for is that it will expand beyond that,” co-founder Joey Zwillinger told Forbes. “There’s something about sugarcane-derived adhesives in solar panels that pieces together a green cycle that is really special.”

 

Article22 offers chic, sustainable jewelry

It can often be difficult to find responsibly-made products that are both stylish and reasonably priced. But if you’re in the market for sustainably-made jewelry, look no further.

According to InStyle, jewelry line Article22‘s collaboration with model and actress Angela Lindvall offers the perfect solution to your sustainable jewelry needs. Based in Brooklyn, the line “works with artisans in Laos that have been upcycling aluminum scrap and other metals since the Vietnam War to create handcrafted, sustainable designs that benefit local communities,” reports InStyle.

Even drawing its name from “the 22nd article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states that everyone has the right to social security,” InStyle says that the creation of one 14-karat gold necklace clears over 120 square feet of land — land that continues to contain “unexploded cluster bombs from the war.”

As far as Lindvall’s collaboration goes, InStyle says her 10-piece collection offers a selection of bracelets, earrings and necklaces. Called “Peace Begins in Me,” InStyle says that some of the items feature Lindvall’s personal motto: “I Am Love. I Am Light. I Am Peace.” Pieces start at $99 and cap at $1,248.

To shop the collection, click here.

Sustainable cotton brand launches line for women

Everyone should have soft, comfortable clothes that make them feel cozy and confident.

Enter Kotn, a Toronto-based sustainable cotton brand who just added a new women’s line to their offerings, according to InStyle. The 16-piece women’s line offers “the core essentials every woman’s wardrobe needs,” says InStyle, with pieces ranging from V-neck  T-shirts and high-neck tank tops to cropped sweatshirts and culotte sweatpants.

Perhaps the best part about is Kotn’s sustainability background; the brand consistently partners with farmers in Egypt’s Nile River Delta in an effort to inject fair wages and revamp the local agriculture business, says InStyle. Talk about being a brand for good!

Pieces in the line range from $25 to $120 and come in sizes from XS to L. Click here to shop the line.

Marie Claire publishes first sustainability issue

With 33 percent of consumers seeking out environmentally and socially friendly brands, sustainability is becoming an increasingly high priority for consumers around the world.  But sometimes, shoppers need a little help finding inspiration for their sustainable style pursuits.

Cue Marie Claire, who according to Fashionista just released their first-ever “sustainability-focused” issue, which not only “features stories on eco-friendly fashion faves like Reformation,” but also “profiles eco-fashion activists like Emma Watson and Livia Firth.”

In an interview with FashionistaMarie Claire editor-in-chief Anne Fulenwider shared that the idea for the issue was initiated by her editors at a staff dinner over a year earlier, and finally came to fruition with the help of an advisory board filled with fashion and sustainability experts alike, which included the likes of worldwide sustainability director for Amazon Kara Hurst and representatives from the CFDA.

When asked by Fashionista about the “relentless positivity” of fashion magazines in a time when politics have made a lack of concern about the environment apparent, Fulenwider said she hopes Marie Claire‘s attention to sustainability will have something of a ripple effect.

“I think one of the best things we can do is apply peer pressure,” she told Fashionista. “It’s like the high school rule. If enough cool people are taking this on, those who may not be moved by their own moral compass may change, too.”

Here’s hoping fashion media can incite change! To read about sustainability in Marie Claire, click here.

Making fashion sustainable

Green fashion choices don’t necessarily mean donning an outfit in the earthy tone; it can mean wearing responsibly-sourced fibers that don’t damage the Earth. As for Livia Firth, she opts for the latter option.

According to Vogue, the founder and creative director for Eco-Age (a “consultancy enabling businesses to achieve growth through sustainability”) worked with Italian designed Laura Strambi to produce a Met Gala gown that is equal parts stunning and sustainable.

Made from leather-alternative fiber Piñatex, Firth told Vogue that the fibers “fibers are the by-product of the pineapple harvest in the Philippines so no extra land, water, fertilizers, or pesticides are required to produce them.”

Even beneficial economically, Firth told Vogue that the fiber “provides a new additional income for farmers while creating a vibrant new industry for pineapple-growing countries.”

Here’s hoping for a more environmentally-friendly — and fashionable — future.

To read more about Firth’s complete Met Gala look, click here.

Target unveils new sustainable collection

Target seems to be doing everything right lately.

According to InStyle, the retailer just launched a sustainable collection with global style brand Accompany that includes “40 pieces from the collaboration, which include artisanal, fair-trade items from six countries across five continents.”

With pieces like herringbone throws from India for $88 and gem cuffs from Turkey for $40, InStyle says that Target and Accompany hope the collection will highlight the native craftsmanship of each country.

“Traditional crafts and indigenous methods for creating products are being lost every day, and we aim to support the livelihood and communities of these craftspeople by connecting their goods with a wide consumer base,” said Accompany’s Founder Jason Keehn in a statement. “Through our partnership with Target, we’re able to shine a spotlight on the communities creating these goods and help them continue their traditions, now and in the future.”

If this collection sounds like something you need to own a piece of, InStyle reports that the collection is currently available online and in select stores.

Sephora seeks to inspire budding female entrepreneurs

Likely one of the most recognizable beauty retailers in the game, Sephora isn’t just the store of choice for many makeup buyers; it is also becoming a source of inspiration.

According to FashionistaSephora announced an expansion of their Sephora Accelerate program, which “offers support and mentorship to female entrepreneurs in the beauty space.” The additions to the program include an “open application process” for sustainability and technology fields in the world of beauty, says Fashionista, areas that are both relatively new in that market.

Beyond the new application process, which closed in January, the program is expanding  their Classes for Confidence series, reports Fashionista, which is “the retailer’s schedule of complimentary in-store classes designed to empower women facing major life transitions, such as unemployment or serious illness.”

With over 300 hours of mentorship logged in its first year, Fashionista reports that Sephora’s Head of Social Impact Corrie Conrad said she hopes the program not only keeps Sephora at the fore of the beauty industry, but also inspires women to create their own success stories.

“I think that our purpose of inspiring fearlessness and female empowerment has resonated so authentically,” Conrad told Fashionista. “If you look at our client base, the majority are women — it’s building off of our previous ongoing commitment to [gender] diversity in the workplace.”