Weinstein accusers tweet reactions to arrest

Last week saw a major milestone in the Time’s Up movement.

According to Glamour, former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein “turned himself in for arrest and charges of first- and third-degree rape and committing a criminal sexual act in the first degree” after more than 80 women accused him sexual assault, harassment and misconduct.

Charged on allegations from two women specifically and with more potentially on the way, Glamour says the day the news broke of Weinstein’s arrest saw an onslaught of reactions from accusers on Twitter, who used the moment to once again give voice to the issue of sexual misconduct and harassment — and declare justice in their cause.

“It’s been a long time coming and today my fellow victims and I rejoice and pray no one ever underestimates the power of women when we stand together + scream the truth #WeSpoke #MeToo #TimesUp #LockHimUp,” wrote actor and accuser Lauren SivanGlamour reports

Actor Rose McGowan took to Instagram to share a more lengthy message, says Glamour, one that detailed her pursuit of justice against Weinstein and her hope for survivors of similar mistreatment.

“I, and so many of Harvey Weinstein’s survivors, had given up hope that our rapist would be held accountable by law,” she wrote. “Twenty years ago, I swore that I would right this wrong. Today we are one step closer to justice. We were young women who were assaulted by Weinstein and later terrorized by his vast network of complicity. I stand with my fellow survivors. May his arrest give hope to all victims and survivors everywhere that are telling their truths.”

One tweet from actor Emma de Cauenes, however, neatly summed up the day in only three words:

“Time for justice.”

Watson donates $1.4M to combat sex harassment

Emma Watson is something of a do-gooder: she shops sustainably, she is a proud feminist and is even a UN Women Goodwill ambassador. So as if we all needed another reason to love her and what she stands for, she made it easy and handed us one more.

According to HuffPost, the actor and activist recently donated $1.4 million to the UK Justice and Equality Fund, which aims to create a safe and inclusive environment for all people, following the publication of a “Dear Sisters” open letter. Published in The GuardianHuffPost says the letter was “signed by some 200 women in the British entertainment industry and called on people everywhere to stand in solidarity with Hollywood’s Times Up initiative to fight sexual harassment and inequality. ”

The letter, which served as a “curtain fundraiser for an activist night at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards,” kicked off a similar night of all-black attire and Time’s Up pins similar to what’s been seen in the U.S., says HuffPost.

As for Watson, she explained to The Guardian that the issue of sexual harassment isn’t isolated; rather, it is indicative of a much larger trend.

“It’s easy to dismiss harassment and abuse as being caused by ‘one or two … bad men,’ but the UK statistics point to a much bigger and more structural problem. The issue is systemic.”

It is systemic, indeed — and #TimesUp on perpetuating that system.

Time’s Up hit major milestones in first month

The Time’s Up campaign has achieved quite a bit in its first month in action: from a wide-reaching social media movement to a “black-out” at the Golden Globes to a white-rose moment at the Grammys, Time’s Up is certainly making its presence known in all aspects of pop culture. But now, the movement has reached an important set of milestones in its first month — milestones that will help further its mission in the future.

According to Glamour, at a recent Time’s Up panel in Los Angeles, “Obama administration alum and lawyer Tina Tchen announced that the group had already raised $20 million, from about 20,000 donors across the country.” Additionally, Tchen announced that the campaign has also received 1,000 requests for help, says ELLE, with requests coming from people of all walks of life.

“The need is clearly there, from all industries—farm workers, hotel workers, steel workers,” Tchen said at the panel. “I had a steel worker from Indiana reach out to my office….Time’s Up has spoken to men and women who need help getting safety and equity in the workplace.”

In terms of getting that help to those who need it, Glamour reports that lawyer and one of the founder of the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund Roberta Kaplan said the requests are siphoned through the National Women’s Law Center:

“They have a number of lawyers who volunteer to work on these cases,” she said, “And they’re matching up clients with potential lawyers. Obviously the clients have to decide for themselves whether they want Lawyer A or Lawyer B to represent them.” The calls for help keeping coming in, says Kaplan: “[We’re getting requests] from people similar to some of the ‘me too’ stuff in Hollywood that you’ve heard—maybe not so famous, but people who’ve had bad experiences with someone in the industry—to other industries. I just got an email this morning from a nurse in Louisiana.”

And that $20 million — Kaplan told Glamour that the sum is “not that much,” as it “won’t even meet the current demand” for help. But with the campaign in its infancy and a plan in place to leverage the public platform of Hollywood to gain more traction, the Time’s Up campaign is bound to keep growing.

Just take the Song Suffragettes, for example: formed in 2014 in response a concern that women were being excluded from record labels and radio stations, The Columbian reports that the group of Nashville-based female musicians crafted a song and music video about the movement, with earnings from the song being donated to the Legal Defense Fund.

And Times Up even found a home across the pond, with British natives of Hollywood’s elite — such as Keira Knightley, Emma Thompson and Daisy Ridley — are “in the process of forming their own version of the movement” in Britain, according to Variety, advocating for both equal pay and safer workplaces for women across all industries.

Looks like time has not run out for the Time’s Up movement — and it’s not running out any time soon.

To donate or request help, click here.

Winfrey interviews Ross, Rhimes on ‘Time’s Up’

With the Time’s Up movement quickly gaining momentum, a recent interview brought it back to where it all began to shed light on the campaign’s inception — and it’s future.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Oprah Winfrey interviewed some of the movement’s founders — including Reese Witherspoon, Shonda Rhimes, Natalie Portman, America Ferrera and Tracee Ellis Ross — on CBS Sunday Morning this past week, discussing “the impact their campaign has had on the public, their devotion to raising awareness of sexual harassment and what they hope for the post-Weinstein culture.”

In the interview, Winfrey asked the group how our society can “have a mature, nuanced conversation about how men and women should be relating to each other,” says THR, as recent sexual misconduct allegations have disturbed a variety of industries. Natalie Portman was first to respond, reports THR, offering that the conversation that needs to take place hinges on accepting that we are all human.

“We’re humans. We’re all humans. And I think it’s treating people as fellow humans and — and it’s not because you have a daughter that you respect a woman, it’s not because you have a wife or a sister, it’s because we’re human beings, whether we’re related to a man or not. We deserve the same respect.”

Beyond this assertion, THR says Witherspoon offered that having a fruitful conversation about sexual assault and harassment may not always be possible for women (and men) in other industries; however, with their platform as public figures, they are hoping to break down those barriers to make productive conversation possible.

“You know, we have public voices. We have resources,” Witherspoon said. “But women who are workers in this country have nothing to gain in certain times by coming forward. But we want to help. It gives me strength to hopefully help other women.”

Watch the interview from this past Sunday right here.

‘Time’s Up’ campaign makes powerful statement

As the clock was approaching midnight on Dec. 31, 2017, it wasn’t only counting down the final moments of the year. It was running out the clock on tolerating sexual harassment and misconduct in our society.

According to Mic, on the first day of 2018, “three hundred well-known actresses and women talent agents, writers, directors, producers and entertainment executives” unveiled their “Time’s Up” campaign, an initiative to not only combat rampant sexual assault and harassment in the entertainment industry but in workplaces society at large and for those across the socioeconomic spectrum.

An open letter announcing the movement described it this way:

“The struggle for women to break in, to rise up the ranks and to simply be heard and acknowledged in male-dominated workplaces must end; time’s up on this impenetrable monopoly.”

The movement is not fronted by one specific leader, reports Mic, but instead is “being led by a broad coalition of famous Hollywood women,” such as actors America Ferrera, Emma Stone and Kerry Washington, as well as showrunners Shonda Rhimes and Jill Soloway, and will feature “a series of working groups led by women to combat harassment in different areas.”

As for the specifics of the initiative, Mic cites a few of their plans as reported by The New York Times, which includes the following action items:

• A legal defense fund, backed by $13 million in donations, to help less privileged women — like janitors, nurses and workers at farms, factories, restaurants and hotels — protect themselves from sexual misconduct and the fallout from reporting it.

• Legislation to penalize companies that tolerate persistent harassment, and to discourage the use of nondisclosure agreements to silence victims.

• A drive to reach gender parity at studios and talent agencies that has already begun making headway.