Lovato leaves makeup behind in video for ‘Vogue’

As part of Vogue‘s “American Woman” project to celebrate strong American women, singer Demi Lovato erased her makeup in powerful video that celebrates her inner fortitude and her natural beauty.

According to Today.com, the “Sorry Not Sorry” songstress slowly wipes off all of her stage-ready makeup, looking “defiant” while she “peels off her false lashes and rubs off her lipstick and eye shadow, as ironic audio from vintage makeup tutorials plays in the background.”

Revealing her fresh-faced self, Today.com says Lovato wanted to challenge the makeover myth — the idea that people need to alter their appearances to appear beautiful.

“I think society tells us we need makeovers, but why can’t we embrace the beauty that we naturally have?” she said in an interview with Vogue.

But make no mistake: Lovato likes getting dressed and made up, too, says Today.com, telling the fashion glossy that she enjoys both natural and glam looks. “I love makeup,” she said. “I love doing my hair; I have extensions, but there’s a time and a place for everything, and natural beauty needs to be celebrated.”

She concluded her video with a makeup-free and confident smile into the camera, seemingly saying that there’s nothing wrong with being confident — inside and out.

Watch the video here

LA Sparks channel Beyoncé in response to social media sexism

Women are capable of much more than just preparing snacks to watch a sporting event. So when one Twitter user decided to tell members of the 2016 WNBA Champion Los Angeles Sparks to get off the basketball court and go back into the kitchen, the team served up a slam-dunk response to shut down the social media sexism.

According to HuffPost, the team received several sexist tweets, one of which urged them to “go back to the kitchen bc this isn’t a sport and nobody cares” while another read, “Exterminate all women.” With such harsh words sent their way, HuffPost says the team responded with some inspiration from the queen of slayage herself: Beyoncé.

Creating their own music video of “Sorry,” the Sparks dressed to the nines — and showed off their championship rings — as the kiss-off anthem plays in the background and sexist tweets line the frame, all as they lip-sync the words, “I ain’t sorry.” While the full video was posted to Twitter, HuffPost says it was later removed.

Even though its time online was short-lived, you can watch a one-minute clip from the Sparks’ comeback video here.

Rihanna takes on new role in Malawi

Rihanna is changing the world, not just in her music but in everything she does.

According to TIME, the singer visited Malawi in January to “learn about the educational challenges facing students there,” even “teaching math, reading with kids, and leading chants on the playground.”

Through Global Citizen, its Global Partnership for Education and her Clara Lionel Foundation, TIME says Rihanna is on board to help improve “access to education for some of the world’s poorest students.” Her trip came as an attempt to sway world leaders to pledge $3.1 billion to the Global Partnership for Education, reports TIME, which helps to improve the quality of schools in 89 countries.

In a video released highlighting her trip, TIME says Rihanna discussed the impact of minimal resources on students.

“It’s such a pity that they have to drop out, because they are so smart,” she said. “Everybody’s learning together, and learning at the same pace it seems. It’s sad that has to end for some of them, because they could probably do so much if they had the resources to continue and complete.”

Here’s hoping the efforts of Rihanna and others will help give students the supplies and opportunities they need to thrive.

 

Girlgaze announces film contest

Glamour magazine and the Girlgaze project — a project that supports female-identifying filmmakers and photographers — are teaming up to offer young visual artists a chance to practice their craft on a major stage.

Launching the #NewView film competition, directors are asked to “create an original short film (3-5 minutes) that showcases their point of view — on an issue, on their own life or on our culture,” according to the contest site.

While the contest seeks to understand how young women view the world, it also aims to close the divide between the number of men and women who direct films. According to the #NewView site, “just 11 percent of all directors on the 500 top-grossing domestic films are women. That number is only slightly higher — 32 percent — on short films.”

Judging the competition are a host of celebrity panelists, ranging from Scandal creator Shonda Rhimes, to actress and activist Amandla Stenberg, to Glamour editor-in-chief Cindi Leive. Five winners will receive $3,000 and the potential to be featured in Glamour, as well as “production budgets to create a film for Glamour or one of our brand partners including Birchbox, LuMee, THE OUTNET.COM, and South Coast Plaza.”

To enter, visit the contest site — and be sure to get a move on your film, because entries are due June 30.

(Disclaimer: THL founder Nicole Funaro is a Girlgaze Project ambassador).