Ross responds to reproductive comments from critics

A woman’s plans for her future are no one’s to decide or change but her own — that’s what Tracee Ellis Ross explained in a new interview with Vanity Fair.

According to Glamour, the “Black-ish” actor detailed in the new interview persistent inquiries from fans about her reproductive plans, something she said was likely brought on by her character’s pregnancy during the show’s last season.

But regardless of her character’s pregnancy, Ross told Vanity Fair that comments about her personal decisions are none of anyone’s business.

“I literally have said to people, for real, no joke, ‘Why don’t you just get out of my womb? Like, get out of my uterus,” she said, according to Glamour. “What are you doing in there? And why are you asking those questions? And what makes you think you can ask that?'”

Glamour points out that this is not the first time Ross has had to defend her choices while also inspiring other women to do the same. In her Glamour Women of the Year Awards speech in 2017, she explained that her life is her’s to live.

“My life is mine. Those words stopped me in my tracks,” Ross said, according to Glamour. “Those words brought tears to my eyes because, yes, I’ve been living my life—but not to my own expectations. Not for me.”

May we all live our lives not for others, but for ourselves.

Read the full interview here.

Ireland votes to repeal abortion ban

Irish voters have spoken.

According to USA TODAY, voters in a recent referendum have “overwhelmingly backed a repeal of Ireland’s constitutional ban on abortion in a sweeping cultural change representing a move away from the nation’s conservative Catholic roots.”

After all the votes were counted, USA TODAY reports that “66.4% supported the repeal out of 2.1 million votes cast,” with only one county — Donegal — giving a ‘no’ majority vote.

Calling it a “quiet revolution,” USA TODAY says Prime Minister Leo Varadkar has acknowledged the people’s will, as well as their hope to build a modern Ireland.

“The people have spoken,” he said. “The people have said that we want a modern constitution for a modern country, that we trust women and we respect them to make the right decision and the right choices about their health care.”

The majority vote now means that the country’s government will attempt to draft and pass legislation that allows abortions in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, reports USA TODAY, a complete reversal of the current law that prohibits all abortions in the country, save for those needed in life-threatening circumstances.

Supporter and co-director of the country’s Together We Yes group Orla O’Connor called the vote “monumental.”

“The vote is a ‘rejection of an Ireland that treated women as second-class citizens,’ she said, according to USA TODAY. “This is about women’s equality and this day brings massive change, monumental change for women in Ireland, and there is no going back.”

Iceland makes pay inequity illegal

2018 started off with a major change in Iceland.

According to ELLE, Iceland made it illegal to pay women less than men as of Jan. 1, 2018, becoming the first country in the world to “make equal pay the law.” As for the specifics of the law, ELLE reports that it mandates “companies that employ more than 25 people are obliged to obtain a government certificate showing their pay equality policies,” and if they don’t, they will be hit with a fine.

The move to create a more level playing field in the country follows their 2017 announcement of the legislation on International Women’s Day, says ELLE, following through on the year-old promise and asserting their position as a worldwide leader in gender equality.

But their efforts to create a more gender-equal society don’t end there: ELLE says the law is part of an effort to close the gender pay gap completely by 2022.

Former Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson perhaps put it best at the Global Leaders’ Meeting in 2015 when he said, “Men cannot sit idly by when issues such as gender-based violence and the gender pay gap are being discussed. These are not only women’s issues. These are issues of general human rights.”