Munn motions for end to sexual assault

With sexual misconduct at the fore of public discussion, Olivia Munn is keeping the conversation going with a brand-new essay she penned for Entertainment Weekly.

Following her own tale of being on the receiving end of sexual harassment, Glamour says the actor wrote an essay identifying the ways in which our culture must shift in order to prevent abuses of power and further sexual misconduct, starting by pointing out the root of such actions:

“In our world today—and it’s not just Hollywood, it’s the same for girls and women all over the world who have survived sexual abuse and/or harassment—abusers don’t usually get in trouble unless the victim is broken first, because the violating act alone is not damaging enough to spark society’s outrage. It’s a marathon towards self-destruction in order to gain credibility and a vicious circle of victim-blaming. When people ask how these men in powerful positions were able to hurt so many people for so many years, I look to the people at the top and ask those questions.”

Calling the issue not a women’s issue but “an abuse-of-power issue,” Glamour says Munn offered that nothing in our culture can be changed until we change the core of our institutions that breed sweeping male hegemony.

“…Until we eradicate the diseased roots of our infrastructure and make foundational, systemic changes, nothing will change,” she wrote. “We should create a zero-tolerance policy with actionable consequences for sexual assault and any other forms of abuse. Heads of studios, bosses, and CEOs should enforce equal pay because continuing to pay us less perpetuates a bias that women are inferior.”

Concluding her essay, Glamour says Munn asked that those in positions of power go against the system and work to create an inclusive and safe environment for women to grow, succeed and thrive, because after all, “We’re strong. We’re not afraid to call each other out—and we’re not afraid to call you out anymore either.”

Amen to that!

Read the full essay here.

Nicole’s Favorites: Digital Must-Reads

Sometimes, speaking up or putting yourself out there can be extremely difficult. It can take all the confidence and bravery you can muster to finally speak your mind, stand up for yourself or go out on a limb in pursuit of your dreams. But, when you have models of those who have gone before us — those who have busted down doors or pointed out double standards — it can make it a little bit easier for the rest of us who are trying to find our way.

This week, I’ve chosen two pieces that I think are very important to read, albeit for different reasons. One teaches us to speak up in the midst of the most difficult or trying circumstances, while the other offers insight on the roadblocks women may face when striving for success. Both, however, will leave you feeling stronger and inspired. Here are my two favorite online reads for this week:

Gretchen Carlson: What Speaking Up Against Sexual Harassment Did for Me—and Why I Encourage Other Women to Do the Same 

(Trigger warning) The former Fox News host reveals details the sexual assaults she faced as a Miss America candidate and later sexual harassment she faced working her way up the media industry. Her experiences — and the countless others she heard from women with similar stories — then inspired her to write Be FierceStop Harassment and Take Back Your Power, due out on Oct. 17. Read her essay on InStyle here.

Jewel Eliese: How to Get Published: Be Male?

Writer Jewel Eliese breaks down the barriers to success in the world of publishing, which she concludes may be a function of gender, as males — and even females writing under male pseudonyms — have an easier time getting manuscript requests and even published. However, Eliese argues that we, as a society, can change things if we remove gender and its adjoining stereotypes from the equation and focus on the quality of the storytelling, not the name signed at the bottom of a query letter. Read her full article here.

While these pieces certainly point out the many trappings that can go along with gender, they should serve as a source of inspiration, letting us all know that change is possible if we have the courage to pursue it.

XO,

Nicole

Murray serves up essay on gender equality

Having an ally in the fight for gender equality is always a plus. And thanks to tennis star Andy Murray, female athletes in tennis and beyond are getting yet another advocate for securing level playing field — or court.

According to HuffPost, Murray penned an essay for BBC Magazine on “the importance of gender equality in tennis and in all sports,” a topic he learned much about after hiring Amelie Mauresmo, a former professional tennis player who he hired as a coach between 2014 and 2016. It was in this experience, HuffPost sayswhere Murray witnessed firsthand the sexism that plagued her every day, and it was here where he learned he could no longer keep silent on this issue.

Commenting on the tenacity of male and female tennis players, Murray offered that there is no difference between athletes of different genders.

“People often underestimate the amount of work that it takes to become a top tennis player,” he wrote. “And that work ethic is the same whether you are a man or a woman…Anyone who has spent any time with any of the top women will know that they make those same sacrifices and are as determined and committed to winning as any of the top men on the tour.”

Murray concluded his essay by asserting his hope for the future, says HuffPost, offering that a “level playing field” may be coming soon. We hope he’s correct!

To read his essay in full, click here.

 

 

 

‘Goop’ to go to print with Condé Nast

For a digital platform to take on a print form in our web-based era is almost unheard of, but Goop is set to go to print, thanks to a new partnership with Condé Nast.

According to Variety, Gwyneth Paltrow’s ” female-focused digital lifestyle brand” has “teamed up with Condé Nast in a partnership anchored around a print magazine that will encompass content on digital and social media.”

The magazine will be released quarterly starting in September, reports WWD, and will feature both print content from Goop as well as creative and design input from Condé Nast. Centering on themes of health and wellness, WWD says that the concept for a print-version of Goop came to life following a conversation between Paltrow (Goop’s founder and CEO) and Editor in Chief of Vogue and Condé Nast artistic director Anna Wintour.

Variety says the quarterly glossies will be branded as “premium, collectible editions.”

‘Glamour’ goes all-female for February issue

When a magazine designed for women has most of their creative content done by men, there is a problem. That’s why Glamours latest issue features photography, styling, hair and makeup done solely by women.

On on Jan. 3 , Glamour Editor in Chief Cindi Leive published an article on the magazine’s website detailing the percentages of women contributing to the visual elements of the magazine that motivated the change.

“Only 37 percent of the photographers we were using in our own print pages were female, and 32 percent of the hairstylists. (Forty-nine percent of makeup artists were female, but dismayingly the ratio got lower as the story got bigger.)” she wrote.

Sharing that Glamour isn’t the only magazine with the issue, Leive said that she knew it was time to make a change and move toward gender parity. Beginning with their February issue, Leive wrote, “from first page to last, every photo we commissioned was created by a woman: photographers, stylists, hair, makeup, everything.”

Additionally, the magazine will make a concerted effort to increase the number of women in “creative-contributor roles” throughout the year, marking a New Year’s resolution of sorts for the glossy.

Leive closed her announcement of Glamour’s latest endeavor by pointing out that both men and women offer equally valuable contributions, ones that can only be recognized when they are given a chance to shine.

“Women and men alike can be adventurous, experimental, relatable, accessible, or wildly artistic, and our vision of fashion and beauty and life will be richer when all our voices are heard. I can’t wait for Glamour to be part of that.”

Kudos to you, Glamour.